Gallery Gate

Iceland has some of the most beautiful waterfalls in the world. In fact, it seems everywhere you turn there are stunning falls of varied types such as plunge, horsetail, multi-step, segmented, punchbowl and cascade waterfalls. With frequent rain and snow and large glaciers, Iceland provides an ideal setting for falls. As snow and ice melt in summer, the volcanic and basalt Iceland is alive with magnificent and mighty waterfalls that would stun you. Winter waterfalls are sometimes frozen with an aurora borealis overhead . . . also gorgeous while looking unbelievably cold. Here are 25 different Iceland waterfalls.

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view Wondrous Waterfalls in Iceland as presented by: Love These Pics


California Governor Edmund G. Brown Jr. yesterday declared this week as "Wildfire Awareness Week" in recognition of last week's devastating fires northwest of Los Angeles. His proclamation noted, "In an average year, wildfires burn 900,000 acres of California's timber and grasslands." Rains that moved into the area on Monday helped extinguish the fires that started last Thursday along US Route 101 near Camarillo Springs and Thousand Oaks, endangering some 4,000 homes. A firefighting helicopter makes a drop on a wildfire on May 3 in Thousand Oaks, Calif. A huge Southern California wildfire burned through coastal wilderness to the beach on Friday then stormed back through canyons toward inland neighborhoods when winds reversed direction. A man on a rooftop looks at approaching flames as the Springs Fire continues to grow on May 3 near Camarillo, Calif. The wildfire has spread to more than 18,000 acres on day two and is 20 percent contained. Firefighter Justin Romero of the New Mexico based Silver City Hotshots uses a drip torch to build a backfire up the mountain off Potrero Road to control the Springs Fire near Newbury Park, Calif., on May 3. A fierce, wind-driven wildfire spread on Friday along the California coast northwest of Los Angeles, threatening 4,000 homes and a military base as residents were evacuated ahead of the flames and a university campus was closed.

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view Wildfires in California as presented by: Boston Big Picture


Water, it is all around us and yet so many of us are in short supply of it.

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view Drops And Splashes as presented by: Totally Cool Pix



Surrounding the small town of Dadaab, Kenya, is one of the oldest and largest refugee camps in the world, now home more than 332,000 people, mainly from Somalia. (It was originally designed to house just 90,000.) The complex of camps was first established as a temporary solution more than 20 years ago by the United Nations High Commission for Refugees (UNHCR), after Somalia descended into a civil war that continues to this day. According to UN estimates, more than 31,000 additional Somalis have arrived in the camps this year alone, as drought and continuing violence between Somali Government forces and Al-Shabaab militants have forced them to seek long-term refuge. To deal with overcrowding, sanitation, and health problems, UNHCR officials were looking to expand the complex by opening a fourth camp, but Kenyan authorities have frozen the plan due to security concerns. These photos offer a view into life in Dadaab. A Somali refugee girl bites her fingers at Ifo camp near Dadaab, northeastern Kenya, January 6, 2007. A Somali refugee girl covers her face at Dagahaley camp in Dadaab in Kenya's northeastern province. U.N. relief workers retrieve relief supplies after they were air-dropped from a U.S. military plane at Dadaab refugee complex in northeastern Kenya.

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view The World's Largest Refugee Camp Turns 20 as presented by: The Atlantic


Alec Soth with Francesco Zanot: Ping Pong Conversations (Contrasto, October 2013) “is a long, friendly conversation” between Minneapolis-based photographer Alec Soth and the Italian curator and critic Francesco Zanot. “Analyzing his most famous photographs as well as others that have been published or are virtually unknown, Soth reflects upon his career as a photographer. Each picture gives rise to a charter of its own, an original thought or reflection,” the publisher said in a statement about the book. Soth and Zanot discuss the use of color versus black-and-white photographs, staged versus candid photographs, and personal and political issues in conversations that “constitute both a complex examination of Alec Soth’s work and a manual on the reading of photography itself.”

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view Alec Soth on His Work and Photography as presented by: Photo District News


Astronauts aboard the International Space Station have captured stunning views of Earth from space. That is, when they’re not busy making repairs to the station, researching 3-D printing in space, or playing soccer. They take many of those photos when the Earth is draped in the darkness of night. Those nighttime photos often reveal the vast differences in shapes, sizes, and brightness of urban areas on the planet. Can you guess which of the American cities pictured at night is which? Note: all images have been oriented with north to the top.

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view The Earth From Space: Guess the U.S. City at Night as presented by: Wall Street Journal


Since the time of Trinity -- the first nuclear explosion in 1945 -- nearly 2,000 nuclear tests have been performed, with the majority taking place during the 1960s and 1970s. When the technology was new, tests were frequent and often spectacular, and led to the development of newer, more deadly weapons. But starting in the 1990s, there have been efforts to limit the future testing of nuclear weapons, including a U.S. moratorium and a U.N. comprehensive test ban treaty. As a result, testing has slowed -- though not halted -- and there are questions about the future. Who will take over for those experienced engineers who are now near retirement, and should we act as stewards with our enormous stockpiles of nuclear weapons? Gathered here are images from the first 30 years of nuclear testing. Operation Greenhouse took place in the spring of 1951, consisting of four explosions at the Pacific Proving Grounds in the Pacific Ocean. This photo is from the third test, George, on May 9, 1951, the first thermonuclear bomb test, yielding 225 kilotons. A photo of a nuclear bomb detonated by the French government at the Mururoa atoll, French Polynesia. Upshot-Knothole Grable, a test carried out by the U.S. military in Nevada on May 25, 1953. A 280mm nuclear shell was fired 10km into the desert by the M65 Atomic Cannon, detonating in the air, about 500 feet above the ground, with a resulting 15 kiloton explosion.

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view When We Tested Nuclear Bombs as presented by: The Atlantic


Comic-Con International, a celebration of fanboy culture, invades the San Diego Convention Center. Tens of thousands of fans are gathering for all things geek. Toys, comics, artwork, costume contests and gaming are a big part of the agenda for the four-day event that runs through Sunday. Facing the Predator beast, Logan Carter whips out his "Evil Dead"-style chainsaw hand on the final day of Comic-Con. Karol Bartesznski and her dragon make an appearance on the final day of Comic-Con. Zombie characters promoting AtmosFearFX perform outside the San Diego Convention Center on Thursday.

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view Comic-Con invades San Diego Convention Center as presented by: Los Angeles Times



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