Gallery Gate

A half moon over Malaysia's landmark Seri Wawasan Bridge in a clear sunset sky above Putrajaya on June 28, 2004. Putrajaya skies were clear on Monday after a week of smoke from forest fires in Indonesia. Weather forecasters said the problem may last until heavy rains come in October. Stephen Quinto, 17, dressed as 'Night Crawler' joins thousands of comic book fans from around the world at the annual four-day Comic Con convention in San Diego, July 19, 2003. Thousands of fans from around the world gather to peruse a collection of comic books and industry related sci-fi, video and motion picture fantasy products. Australian gymnast Monique Blount practices her floor routine during a training session in Sydney May 17, 2004 for the Australian Gymnastics Championships. The championships that start on Tuesday are one of two Olympic trials to determine who will represent Australian at the 2004 Olympic Games in Athens.

Share/Bookmark

view 32 Shades Of Blue as presented by: Totally Cool Pix


The Matterhorn is a large, jadged mountain standing 4,478 meters (14,692 ft) tall on the border of Switzerland and Italy. One of the highest peaks in the Pennine Alps, the Matterhorn is also known as Monte Cervino in Italian, or Mont Cervin in French. The mountain is famous for being one of the most deadly to summit, with over 500 climbers dying on it since it was first climbed in 1865. Today, many climbers summit the Matterhorn each year, and all the faces of the mountain have been ascended in all seasons, though even the easiest route to the top is considered a fairly difficult climb.

Share/Bookmark

view Matterhorn, Switzerland as presented by: Beautiful Places To Visit


California Governor Edmund G. Brown Jr. yesterday declared this week as "Wildfire Awareness Week" in recognition of last week's devastating fires northwest of Los Angeles. His proclamation noted, "In an average year, wildfires burn 900,000 acres of California's timber and grasslands." Rains that moved into the area on Monday helped extinguish the fires that started last Thursday along US Route 101 near Camarillo Springs and Thousand Oaks, endangering some 4,000 homes. A firefighting helicopter makes a drop on a wildfire on May 3 in Thousand Oaks, Calif. A huge Southern California wildfire burned through coastal wilderness to the beach on Friday then stormed back through canyons toward inland neighborhoods when winds reversed direction. A man on a rooftop looks at approaching flames as the Springs Fire continues to grow on May 3 near Camarillo, Calif. The wildfire has spread to more than 18,000 acres on day two and is 20 percent contained. Firefighter Justin Romero of the New Mexico based Silver City Hotshots uses a drip torch to build a backfire up the mountain off Potrero Road to control the Springs Fire near Newbury Park, Calif., on May 3. A fierce, wind-driven wildfire spread on Friday along the California coast northwest of Los Angeles, threatening 4,000 homes and a military base as residents were evacuated ahead of the flames and a university campus was closed.

Share/Bookmark

view Wildfires in California as presented by: Boston Big Picture



Back in August, 1995, Russian IL-76TD RA-76842 plane was captured by the militants from Taliban movement. Along with the plane an aircrew was also captured (8 people.) And today the story is going to go about this plane. IL-76 was owned by a private airlines from Kazan called Aerostan. The plane was subleased out by the Afghan government and was shipping ammunition supplies en-route Tirana-Sharjah-Kabul. The cargo was conforming with all norms of ICAO and was permitted for shipping. It was not their first flight to Kabul; special radio waves didnít air any prohibitions or limitations for the flight. Everything was going alright. But over Afghanistan territory, while the plane was 8,000 meters high, it was captured by MIG-21 fighter jet which was owned by Taliban movement. A short time after the plane was forced to land at the airport of Kandahar city. No sooner than a year passed, 378 days if to be exact, before Russian pilots managed to make an outraging runaway; they played upon a silly blunt of security who allowed them to start repairing the plane. They were acting as sharp and consistently as ever: engineers were shutting the loading ramp, a pilot was starting engines and a radio operator was checking radio lines. Behavior or the air crew didnít attract a bit of securityís attention. Maybe just the loading ramp made them somewhat uneasy. Slowly but firmly they were heading their way to a take-off which was too short. Itís not a fast thing to speed up a huge aircraft with some militants chasing you on a military car. But another capturing didnít work this time and the plane got off from the last meter of the runway.

Share/Bookmark

view Then Captured Plane as presented by: English Russia


Five days ago, in the northeastern port city of Dalian, China, two oil pipelines exploded, sending flames hundreds of feet into the air and burning for over 15 hours, destroying several structures - the cause of the explosion is under investigation. The damaged pipes released thousands of gallons of oil, which flowed into the nearby harbor and the Yellow Sea. The total amount of oil spilled is still not clear, though China Central Television earlier reported an estimate of 1,500 tons (400,000 gallons), as compared to the estimated 94 - 184 million gallons in the BP oil spill off the Louisiana coast. The oil slick has now grown to at least 430 square kilometers (165 sq mi), forcing beaches and port facilities to close while government workers and local fishermen work to contain and clean up the spill. Firefighters walk near an oil pipeline blast site in Dalian, Liaoning province, China early on July 17, 2010. Firefighters later extinguished the fire that raged for more than 15 hours after two oil pipelines exploded in the port of Dalian, the Xinhua news agency said. Two workers try to rescue their co-worker (left) from drowning in the oil slick while he was attempting to fix an underwater pump during the oil spill clean-up operations at Dalian's Port on July 20, 2010. Oil coats a boat rope on July 18, 2010 after a huge spill following the fire at the port in Dalian, China.

Share/Bookmark

view Oil spill in Dalian, China as presented by: Boston Big Picture


The years leading up to the declaration of war between the Axis and Allied powers in 1939 were tumultuous times for people across the globe. The Great Depression had started a decade before, leaving much of the world unemployed and desperate. Nationalism was sweeping through Germany, and it chafed against the punitive measures of the Versailles Treaty that had ended World War I. China and the Empire of Japan had been at war since Japanese troops invaded Manchuria in 1931. Germany, Italy, and Japan were testing the newly founded League of Nations with multiple invasions and occupations of nearby countries, and felt emboldened when they encountered no meaningful consequences. The Spanish Civil War broke out in 1936, becoming a rehearsal of sorts for the upcoming World War -- Germany and Italy supported the nationalist rebels led by General Francisco Franco, and some 40,000 foreign nationals traveled to Spain to fight in what they saw as the larger war against fascism. In the last few pre-war years, Nazi Germany blazed the path to conflict -- rearming, signing a non-aggression treaty with the USSR, annexing Austria, and invading Czechoslovakia. Meanwhile, the United States passed several Neutrality Acts, trying to avoid foreign entanglements as it reeled from the Depression and the Dust Bowl years. Below is a glimpse of just some of these events leading up to World War II. Adolf Hitler, age 35, on his release from Landesberg Prison, on December 20, 1924. Hitler had been convicted of treason for his role in an attempted coup in 1923 called the Beer Hall Putsch. This photograph was taken shortly after he finished dictating "Mein Kampf" to deputy Rudolf Hess. Eight years later, Hitler would be sworn in as Chancellor of Germany, in 1933. apanese soldiers involved in street fighting in Shanghai, China in 1937. The battle of Shanghai lasted from August through November of 1937, eventually involving nearly one million troops. In the end, Shanghai fell to the Japanese, after over 150,000 casualties combined. Solemnly promising the nation his utmost effort to keep the country neutral, U.S. President Franklin D. Roosevelt is shown as he addressed the nation by radio from the White House in Washington, Sept. 3, 1939. In the years leading up to the war, the U.S. Congress passed several Neutrality Acts, pledging to stay (officially) out of the conflict.

Share/Bookmark

view World War II: Before the War as presented by: The Atlantic


The center of aircrafts display ďKubinkaĒ in the Moscow region has just turned 75. To celebrate such a date the best aerobatic teams of Russia came to participate in the show.

Share/Bookmark

view Iron Birds In the Sky as presented by: English Russia


NASA's Space Shuttle Discovery is scheduled to make its last trip into low Earth orbit. Discovery will be traveling to the International Space Station, carrying a large module packed with supplies and critical spare parts, as well as a robotic assistant named Robonaut 2. With the entire Space Shuttle program scheduled for mandatory retirement this year, Discovery is the most-flown spacecraft in history, traveling 143 million miles (230 million kilometers) over the course of its 39 missions since 1984, and spending nearly a full year in orbit. Gathered here are images of Discovery, its crew, and support staff from the past several months, while the spacecraft was being prepared for today's launch. This mission, STS-133, is scheduled for liftoff at 4:50 p.m Eastern Time. Robonaut 2 waits inside the electromagnetic interference chamber at Johnson Space Center following tests that ensure the robot's electronic systems won't cause problems for other important systems at the International Space Station. R2 will be journeying to the space station onboard Discovery during the STS-133 mission. At NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, shuttle Discovery pauses in between Orbiter Processing Facility-3 and the Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB) during a move called "rollover" on September 9th, 2010. Once inside the VAB, the shuttle will be joined to its solid rocket boosters and external fuel tank. Later, Discovery was scheduled to "rollout" to Launch Pad 39A for its launch to the International Space Station on the STS-133 mission. Spectators watch as space shuttle Discovery lifts off from the Kennedy Space Center in Cape Canaveral, Florida, February 24, 2011. Six astronauts are aboard on a mission to the International Space Station.

Share/Bookmark

view Space Shuttle Discovery's Final Launch as presented by: The Atlantic



view our privacy policy & terms of service