Gallery Gate

The Northern Hemisphere once more begins its tilt towards the Sun, awakening flowers, ushering in new life, and coaxing people outdoors once again. The changing of the season is easily observed in gardens, parks, zoos, farms, festivals and more. Collected here are a handful of photographs showing signs of Spring, 2010, as the final remnants of last winter start to melt away. A man reaches for a flower in a field at Carlsbad Ranch in Carlsbad, California on March 29, 2010. Honey the reindeer keeps a close eye on her newly born calf at the University of Alaska Fairbanks Agricultural and Forestry Experiment Station in Fairbanks, Alaska on April 1, 2010. The 17-pound male, whose name will be determined by submitted suggestions, is the first reindeer birth of the year. Nuns throw flowers during a procession in a Holy Week procession in Cordoba, Spain, Sunday, April 4, 2010.

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view Signs of Spring, 2010 as presented by: Boston Big Picture


Much of Iraq is now in chaos, and fighters from the the Islamic State in Iraq and Syria (ISIS), are fueling the instability, attacking towns at will and making large gains in territory. Last week, ISIS militants swarmed into several minority villages in northern Iraq, prompting tens of thousands of Yazidis and Christians to flee for their lives during their push toward the Kurdish regional capital of Arbil. Iraq's human rights minister told Reuters that IS militants have killed at least 500 members of Iraq's Yazidi ethnic minority during their offensive. U.S. warplanes bombed ISIS fighters and weapons on Friday after President Barack Obama said Washington must act to prevent "genocide." At least 20,000 civilians who had been besieged by jihadists on Sinjar mountain have safely escaped to Syria and been escorted by Kurdish forces back into Iraq, officials said. Thousands more are still feared to be trapped in the region, forced to choose between starvation and dehydration, or a descent down the mountains toward armed militants.

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view Desperate Iraqi Minorities Flee ISIS Attacks as presented by: The Atlantic


U.S. Forest Service firefighters let the Station fire burn along Angeles Crest Highway in the early morning hours in La Canada Flintridge. Backfires were set to keep flames from the mammoth blaze away from the foothill communities, including La Canada and La Crescenta. Magneto, left, and Jackson bail from their surfboards after a long ride during the inaugural Surf City Surf Dog competition, a fundraiser for animal welfare organizations. Each dog had 12 minutes to catch as many waves as possible. Kobe Bryant celebrates after the Lakers defeated the Orlando Magic, 99-86, in Game 5 of the NBA Finals to win the 15th championship for the franchise.

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view 2009 in Focus: Best of Times photography as presented by: Los Angeles Times



In his 10 years in the U.S. Army, Luis Lopez served 10 years in Iraq and Afghanistan, earning medals and rising to the rank of staff sergeant. Mr. Lopez is also an illegal immigrant. The 28-year-old native of Mexico was discharged in December from the Army after applying for U.S. citizenship. His case reflects the federal government’s complex relationship with illegal immigrants in the armed forces. Mr. Lopez’s story took a few twists and turns, including a recommendation from his commanding officer that he granted citizenship. On Wednesday, in an office in Anchorage, Alaska, he became a citizen. Luis Lopez holds a photo of himself in his former Staff Sgt. Army uniform while living in his girlfriend’s apartment in Eagle River Alaska. Lopez was discharged after ten years of honorable service because he applied for citizenship and is awaiting the outcome of his pending immigration case. Mr. Lopez takes the U.S. citizenship oath on Wednesday in Anchorage, Alaska. Mr. Lopez reviews paperwork at a citizenship ceremony on Wednesday.

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view Soldier Finds Minefield on Road to Citizenship as presented by: Wall Street Journal


Relatives of the Catholic demonstrators shot to death by British troops on Northern Ireland’s Bloody Sunday cried tears of joy Tuesday as an epic fact-finding probe ruled that their loved ones were innocent and the soldiers entirely to blame for the 1972 slaughter. The investigation took 12 years and nearly 200 million pounds ($290 million), but the victims’ families and the British, Irish and U.S. governments welcomed the findings as priceless to heal one of the gaping wounds left from Northern Ireland’s four-decade conflict that left 3,700 dead. Thousands of residents of Londonderry – a predominantly Catholic city long synonymous with Britain’s major mass killing from the Northern Ireland conflict – gathered outside the city hall to watch the verdict come in, followed by a lengthy apology from Prime Minister David Cameron in London that moved many locals long distrustful of British leaders. The probe found that soldiers opened fire without justification at unarmed, fleeing civilians and lied about it for decades, refuting an initial British investigation that branded the demonstrators as Irish Republican Army bombers and gunmen. Cameron, who was just 5 years old when the attack occurred, said it was “both unjustified and unjustifiable.” A young child, resting on a man's shoulders, holds a hanging effigy of a British soldier during a march in Belfast, capital of Northern Ireland, Feb. 1972. The rally follows the deadly shooting of 14 demonstrators by British paratroopers during the civil rights march. A young mother and son from the Bogside area in Londonderry, stop infront of a mural, Thursday, Jan 30, 1997, depicting a scene from Bloody Sunday. The event occured 25 years ago, when British Troops opened fire during a civil rights march and 14 marchers were killed.

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view Northern Ireland’s Bloody Sunday Report Released as presented by: Denver Post


At the end of 1950’s there was a strong shortage of aircraft engineering personnel at many of aircraft factories. Thus, an idea of establishing a department of aircraft construction at Novosibirsk Electronical Technical Institute was put forward. Currently there are as many as six departments in the structure of the aircraft construction faculty, and they are: aerohydrodynamics, gas-dynamic impulse devices, environment problems connected with engineering, aircraft construction, flying machines durability and engineering thermophysics. Aircraft construction department laboratory is one of the most impressive ones in the whole institute. So, let’s have a look at this. Aircraft construction department was established in 1959. During this time there were more than 3,000 experts trained who now work at one of the best-known technical and engineering institutions of the country. As early as from the fourth year students can apply for an internship and get a job over there after their graduation. The department gives a unique opportunity to study according to a special and individual curriculum which allows to devote much attention to the subject that a student will be required to have for their job-to-be.

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view Aircraft Construction Laboratory as presented by: English Russia


A diver vaulted from the board during warm-ups in the diving portion of the 85th annual Westchester County Swimming and Diving Championships at Sprain Ridge Park in Hastings-on-Hudson, N.Y., in July. Competitors ranged in age from 10 to 13. Kelly Anne Burns, center, rode atop her husband Mike Smith Rivera’s shoulders during the New York Clown Theater Festival in September. Firefighter Jim Lanigan resuscitated a puppy at the scene of a small apartment fire in Manhattan in July.

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view 2010: Greater New York’s Year in Photos as presented by: Wall Street Journal


April 30th, marks the 35th Anniversary of the fall of Saigon, when communist North Vietnamese forces drove tanks through the former U.S.-backed capital of South Vietnam, smashing through the Presidential Palace gates. The fall of Saigon marked the official end of the Vietnam War and the decadelong U.S. campaign against communism in Southeast Asia. The conflict claimed some 58,000 American lives and an estimated 3 million Vietnamese. The war left divisions that would take years to heal as many former South Vietnamese soldiers were sent to Communist re-education camps and hundreds of thousands of their relatives fled the country. In Vietnam, today is called Liberation Day and the government staged a parade down the former Reunification Boulevard that featured tank replicas and goose-stepping soldiers in white uniforms. Some 50,000 party cadres, army veterans and laborers gathered for the spectacle, many carrying red and gold Vietnamese flags and portraits of Ho Chi Minh, the father of Vietnam’s revolution. In a reminder of how the Communist Party retains a strong grip on the flow of information despite the opening of the economy, foreign journalists were forbidden from conducting interviews along the parade route. The area was sealed off from ordinary citizens, apparently due to security concerns.

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view A Look Back at the Vietnam War on the 35th Anniversary of the Fall of Saigon as presented by: Denver Post



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