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Joan Roma of Spain has won Monday's eighth stage of the Dakar Rally in the car category, while Stephane Peterhansel finished fourth, to keep the overall lead, two days after a stage was canceled because of a snowed-in Andes pass. his is the fourth consecutive year the race is being held in South America. It had been run in Europe and Africa until the 2008 race was canceled because of fears of terrorism. The rally moved to South America the next year. he past three years the race consisted of loop courses from Buenos Aires to Chile and back to Buenos Aires. This year the race began in Argentina, passes through Chile and finishes in Lima, Peru, on Jan. 15. Spain's biker Marc Coma checks his KTM during the eighth stage of the 2012 Argentina-Chile-Peru Dakar Rally at the Atacama desert between Copiapo and Antofagasta in Chile, Monday, Jan. 9, 2012. Poland's Rafal Sonik races his Yamaha quad in the fourth stage of the 2012 Argentina-Chile-Peru Dakar Rally between San Juan and Chilecito, Argentina, Wednesday Jan. 4, 2012. Hummer driver Robby Gordon and co-driver Johnny Campbell, both of the U.S., compete in the third stage of the 2012 Argentina-Chile-Peru Dakar Rally between San Rafael and San Juan, Argentina.

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Sergio Adrian Hernández, 15 years old, was killed Monday evening on a bridge in Ciudad Juárez, Mexico, across the river from El Paso, Texas. Above, Mexican Federal Police at the scene of the shooting. A spokeswoman for the FBI’s El Paso office said the incident was provoked by a group of rock-throwing suspects. According to two witnesses on the bridge, the victim was part of a group of teens who had sidestepped border checkpoints on the Santa Fe Bridge — which is flanked by border checkpoints on either side — and entered the U.S. on foot. Above, family members cried near the scene of the shooting. Two witnesses said none of the teens were carrying backpacks or appeared to have weapons. According to the witnesses, one of the Mexican youths — not the young Mr. Hernández — had thrown rocks at the border patrol agents. A U.S. Border Patrol agent investigated on the U.S. side. The FBI’s account differed. It said border patrol agents responded to “a group of suspected illegal aliens being smuggled into the U.S. from Mexico.” Above, a Mexican Federal Police officer lowered himself down to the scene. It was the second time in eight days that a Mexican was killed on the international border by U.S. authorities. Above, family members cursed at U.S. Border Patrol agents.

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view Conflicting Reports Over Border Death as presented by: Wall Street Journal


The Nikon Small World Photomicrography Competition lets us see beyond the capabilities of our unaided eyes. Almost 2000 entries from 70 countries vied for recognition in the 37th annual contest, which celebrates photography through a microscope. Images two through 21 showcase the contest's winners in order, and are followed by a selection of other outstanding works. Scientists and photographers turned their attention on a wide range of subjects, both living and man-made, from lacewing larva to charged couple devices, sometimes magnifying them over 2000 times their original size. A freshwater shrimp eye and head shot with image stacking photography by Jose R. Almodovar at the Microscopy Center, Biology Department, UPR Mayaguez Campus in Mayaquez, Puerto Rico. Dr. Igor Siwanowicz of the Max Planck Institute of Neurobiology in Martinsried, Germany shot "Portrait of a Chrysopa sp. (green lacewing) larva" at 20x magnification using the confocal method. Using laser-triggered high-speed macrophotography, Dr. John H. Brackenbury of the University of Cambridge in Cambridge, UK captured a water droplet containing a pair of mosquito larvae.

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view Nikon Small World Photomicrography Competition as presented by: Boston Big Picture



The Dakar Rally roared out of Buenos Aires with a ceremonial parade of hundreds of vehicles departing from its famed Obelisk on Saturday, Jan. 1. The 16-day trek takes drivers 5,903 miles across northern Argentina, through the Andes, the Atacama Desert of Chile and back to the Argentine capital. Officials listed a record 430 official starters, up from the 362 who were enrolled last year. The actual number starting the race is always lower. This year's route goes northwest from Buenos Aires, with the racers crossing into Chile. Racers then head north through the Atacama Desert then to the Arica in the far north of Chile, on the border with Peru. The race then turns south and crosses back into Argentina on Jan. 12. It ends on Jan. 16 in Buenos Aires. The rally was always held in Europe and Africa until the 2008 race was canceled because of fears of terrorism. It was moved to South America the next year. The rally is run in the middle of the South American summer, a highlight for school children on vacation. BMW car driver Stephane Peterhansel and co-driver Jean-Paul Cottret, both from France, compete during the second stage of the 2011 Argentina-Chile Dakar Rally between Cordoba and San Miguel de Tucuman, Argentina. Volkswagen's driver Giniel De Villiers, from South Africa, and co-driver Dirk Von Zitzewitz, from Germany, compete in the third stage of the 2011 Argentina-Chile Dakar Rally between San Miguel de Tucuman and Jujuy, Argentina. Mitsubishi's driver Guilherme Spinelli and co-driver Youssef Haddad, both from Brazil, compete during the fourth stage of the 2011 Argentina-Chile Dakar Rally between Jujuy, Argentina, and Calama, Chile.

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Digital Camera Photographer of the Year is one of the world's biggest photography competitions, attracting more than 100,000 entries in 2009. The Telegraph is, once again, sponsoring a category in this year's competition. This gallery contains some recent images that caught our eye. See many more photos, and instructions on how to enter, at photoradar.com/photographer-of-the-year Meeting up in Madagascar by janknaapen, who says: This maki (lemur) living at a hotel near Isalo N.P. in Madagascar is hand-raised and therefore frank and enterprising. It surprised us as it was fooling around in its owner's car, looking at us from behind the steering wheel. Joy, sponsored by the Daily Telegraph. chalk by oeo, who says: After discovering my daughter had eaten some tasty chalk I decided to take a photograph of her before I cleaned her up. This way mum would not know a thing - butshe told mum within seconds of her coming home. Still, she rarely complains of indigestion. A child playing with the rain, using the umbrella from taro leaves.

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The exhibit “Politics in Play” presents three very distinct styles of campaign photography by Damon Winter, Lauren Fleishman, & Ricardo Cases. Looked at side by side, their three approaches can serve as vibrant shorthand for some of the messages, stances, and moods of this election. With his dramatic capturing of shadows and light, Damon conveys the staged aspects of the process. At the other end of the spectrum, Ricardo’s pictures, strobed and super-bright, play on an idealized—even neutralized—vision of America, replete with blue skies, perfect white teeth, and success within reach. And Lauren’s photos, shot in black and white, lend a classic, timeless feel to their unscripted moments. Expectations are in check for November 6th; perhaps, latent in this rich imagery, are portents for that day’s results. – courtesy Anna Van Lenten. Damon Winteris a staff photographer for The New York Times. Lauren Fleishman is a freelance photographer. She followed the 2012 Romney campaign for Time magazine. Ricardo Cases is a freelance photographer who covered the Republican primary in Florida for Time.

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view Politics in Play: Photography in the 2012 Race as presented by: Photo District News


A powerful earthquake hit the Sichuan province of China near Ya'an city over the weekend reportedly killing some 200 people. Thousands of rescue workers have been deployed to help feed, treat, and house the displaced residents and help clear roads blocked by landslides in the remote area. The quake comes just short of five years after a massive quake in the same region killed some 70,000 people. Rescuers save an injured woman after an earthquake hit Baosheng Township in Lushan County, Ya'an City, southwest China's Sichuan Province, on April 20. Rescuers poured into a remote corner of southwestern China on Sunday. A woman whose relatives were killed in Saturday's earthquake cries while sitting on a pile of rubble in Lingguan township in Baoxing county of southwest China's Sichuan province on April 22. The earthquake in Sichuan province killed some 200 people, injured more than 11,000 and left nearly two dozen missing, mostly in the rural communities around Ya'an city, along the same fault line where a devastating quake to the north killed more than 70,000 people in Sichuan and neighboring areas five years ago in one of China's worst natural disasters. People running during aftershocks to avoid falling rocks on their way to the city of Ya'an, southwest China's Sichuan province, on April 21. Clogged roads, debris and landslides impeded rescuers as they battled to find survivors of a powerful earthquake in mountainous southwest China that has left some 200 dead.

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"It was one of those images that demanded more investigation," says photographer and film maker Andrew Zuckerman of a photo of a macaw that he had shot for his first book, CREATURE. So for his latest project, Zuckerman focused his lenses on birds. "Imagery of birds is found in all ancient art and has been repeatedly used throughout history—I was curious if I could add something to this tradition." The result is the new book BIRD from Chronicle Books, a collection of avian photographs stunning for their brilliant simplicity. Here, DISCOVER presents some high-flying highlights. From the plebeian pigeon to the rarest bird of all. The Spix's macaw, or the little blue macaw, may be the most endangered bird in the world. The last remaining member of its species known to be living in the wild, a lone male, was discovered in Brazil in 1990, but it has not been seen since 2000. Approximately 120 individuals now survive in captive breeding programs. Fifty of these are kept in the Al Wabra Wildlife Preservation in Qatar where Andrew captured them on film. This scarlet macaw is found in the subtropical rainforests of Central and South America. Individual birds can grow up to three feet in length, with nearly half that length consisting of long, tapered tail feathers. here's something special in a blue feather. Unlike feathers of other colors, which are pigmented, bright blue feathers, like these on the vulturine guineafowl, are the result of nanoscale structures in the feather barbs. Microscopic air cavities within the feather barbs are arranged just so to allow coherent light scattering, creating a blue hue. Green feathers are typically the result of a combination of blue structural color and yellow pigments.

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view Stunning High-Speed Photos of Birds as presented by: Discover Magazine



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