Gallery Gate

Twenty-five awesome photos from The Denver Post’s photographic archives. From a 1929 Denver cattle auction to a 1972 anti-war protest in Boulder and much more. NOV 20 1968 - Trick Shooter Ray Hollander takes Aim at Cigarette in the Mouth of his wife, Genie. The performer who lost hand and part of another credits a 1955 Denver appearance on being a turning point in life. 11-7-1952 - Worker Extracted from Cavein-Police and fire department rescue crews were called Tuesday afternoon to extricate Lyle Zigler at 107 Lincoln street, a construction worker, after he was trapped under several hundreds pounds of earth while working on a sewer excavation project at Smith road and Grape street. OCT 17 1963 - Negro Looks Into White Barbershop, Stronghold of Segregation in Public Accommodations. Officials say white barbers, by custom, do not cut Negroes' hair. If Negro insists, barber often gives poor haircut.

Share/Bookmark

view 25 Awesome Photos from The Denver Post Archive as presented by: Denver Post


On Saturday, the 178th Oktoberfest opened in Munich, Germany, with the traditional tapping of the first keg of beer by Munich's mayor, Christian Ude, shouting "O'zapft is!" ("It's tapped!"). The Bavarian festival takes place over 17 days, and some 6 million people are expected to attend. Last year, visitors drank more than 7 million one-liter mugs of beer. Attendance is free, but the beer will cost you: The price of a mug at any of the 14 tents this year comes to €9.20 ($12.60 U.S.). Gathered here are some of the scenes from Oktoberfest 2011's first weekend. People stretch out to reach a beer mug in the Hofbräuhaus-tent after the opening of Oktoberfest, in a beer tent in Munich, Germany, on September 17, 2011. Opening day of the 178th Oktoberfest in Munich, Germany.

Share/Bookmark

view Oktoberfest 2011 as presented by: The Atlantic


For the past seven years, David Guttenfelder has witnessed and documented the changing landscape of Afghanistan. Although mostly embedded with coalition troops, he has also covered the presidential elections, bodybuilders in Kabul, the state of Afghan prisons and daily life in the country. Guttenfelder is the chief Asia photographer for The Associated Press and over the past seven years has offered the general public a close-up, intimate look at the lives of troops fighting in the mountains and remote regions of Afghanistan. U.S. Marines from the 2nd MEB, 1st Battalion 5th Marines move in formation through farm fields after landing by helicopter in an overnight night air assault near the Taliban stronghold of Nawa in Afghanistan's Helmand province Thursday July 2, 2009. Thousands of U.S. Marines poured from helicopters and armored vehicles into Taliban-controlled villages of southern Afghanistan Thursday in the first major operation under President Barack Obama's strategy to stabilize the country. A U.S. Army vehicle fires on Taliban positions on a mountain side, outside a base held by the Army's 2nd Battalion, 12th Infantry Regiment, 4th Brigade Combat Team, 4th Infantry Division in the Pech River Valley of Afghanistan's Kunar province. Marines from the 24th Marine Expeditionary Unit, one with the names of fallen colleagues tattooed on his back, bathe at a forward operating base in southern Afghanistan Saturday, April 26, 2008. Some 3,500 U.S. Marines arrived in Afghanistan to help NATO's increasingly bloody fight against the Taliban.

Share/Bookmark

view Captured Collection: David Guttenfelder in Afghanistan as presented by: Denver Post



Peter Otieno, 5, stood at a school in Kibera, Kenya’s largest slum, Monday. He is infected with HIV and both his parents died of AIDS. The preschool is managed by the Nyanyo Project, which works to empower grandparents who care for their HIV-positive grandchildren. A man pulled his bicycle at a parking area outside a railway station in Tachikawa, western Tokyo. Volunteers David Patterson and Matthew Poorman searched a dumpster Tuesday in Holiday City, Ohio, for three brothers who have been missing since a Thanksgiving Day visit to their father’s home: Andrew Skelton, 9, Alexander Skelton, 7, and Tanner Skelton, 5. Their father, John Skelton, has tried to hang himself and police said he lied to them.

Share/Bookmark

view Photos of the Day: Nov. 30 as presented by: Wall Street Journal


A male orangutan named Tuan gets his teeth into a pumpkin at the Hagenbeck zoo in Hamburg. Jemima the racoon enjoys a feast of pumpkin at Drusillas Park in Alfriston, East Sussex. A Japanese macaque plays with a pumpkin at the Bioparco zoo. Delivering the animals' meals in imaginative and unusual ways ensures they receive a varied and diverse diet, as well as encouraging them to think and work for their food as they would in the wild. North China leopards (Panthera pardus japonensis) also investigate Halloween pumpkin treats at the zoo in Hungary.

Share/Bookmark

view Animals Tuck Into Halloween Pumpkins At Zoos Around The World as presented by: Telegraph Media Group


On March 24, 1989, the oil tanker Exxon Valdez had just entered Alaska's Prince William Sound, after departing the Valdez Marine Terminal full of crude oil. At 12:04 am, the ship struck a reef, tearing open the hull and releasing 11 million gallons of oil into the environment. Initial responses by Exxon and the Alyeska Pipeline Company were insufficient to contain much of the spill, and a storm blew in soon after, spreading the oil widely. Eventually, more than 1,000 miles of coastline were fouled, and hundreds of thousands of animals perished. Exxon ended up paying billions in cleanup costs and fines, and remains tied up in court cases to this day. The captain, Joseph Hazelwood, was acquitted of being intoxicated while at the helm, but convicted on a misdemeanor charge of negligent discharge of oil, fined $50,000, and sentenced to 1,000 hours of community service. Though the oil has mostly disappeared from view, many Alaskan beaches remain polluted to this day, crude oil buried just inches below the surface.

Share/Bookmark

view The Exxon Valdez Oil Spill: 25 Years Ago Today as presented by: The Atlantic


Several hundred participants from all over Europe re-enact 'Operation Amherst'. Operation Amherst was a special mission during World War II to liberate Drenthe (a province of the Netherlands). Authentic blank firing guns where used during the re-enactment.

Share/Bookmark

view WWII Re-enactment in Assen, the Netherlands as presented by: GigaPica


Utah is known for its impossible canyons and rock formations. Arches National Park in Eastern Utah is one of the most impressive. Here, natural sandstone arches, formed over millions of years when salt beds covered the area, create an amazing orange brown landscape. The area has a rich history as well as fascinating geology, it was home to the Ute and Paiute tribes. Ute petroglyphs from around 250 years ago can still be seen today. Bryce Canyon, also in Utah, should not be overlooked as a destination if beautiful rock formations captivate you.

Share/Bookmark

view Arches National Park, Utah, USA as presented by: Beautiful Places To Visit



view our privacy policy & terms of service