Gallery Gate

An effort to take the peace, serenity and perhaps the monotony out of wedding photos has brought a hot trend that incorporates some slightly dark humor: wedding party attack photos. Beginning with Quinn Miller’s image of a Tyrannosaurus Rex crashing a wedding party’s photo op, the fad is gaining in popularity among newlyweds. Even the Galactic Empire enjoys a good photobomb. Inspired by the viral image of a dinosaur attacking a wedding party, admitted “Star Wars” nerds Danielle and Tony Lombardo of Little Blue Lemon Photography made Imperial AT-AT walkers the uninvited guests at the wedding of Leslie Seiler and Paul Kingston. Danielle and Tony photographed their son’s AT-AT toy in their studio, recreating the same lighting conditions of the wedding photo, and meticulously stitched the two photos together. In another photo, Mr. Stay Puft, the marshmallow man from the movie “Ghostbusters,” paid a surprise visit to a wedding party in Ontario, Canada.

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view The Ultimate Wedding Crashers as presented by: ABC News


One of the most indelible memories in the collective psyche of Americans - and the world - comes from the images of the World Trade Center following the terrorist attacks on the United States, September 11, 2001. Yesterday, Americans and the world collectively remembered those who lost their lives in New York, Washington and Pennsylvania ten years after that unforgettable day. This post (edited by Leanne Burden) shows the transformation, of what became known as Ground Zero, over the last ten years. A memorial rises from the ashes of that day on September 11, 2011. A man stood in the rubble and called out, asking if anyone needed help, after the collapse of the first World Trade Center Tower on Sept. 11, 2001. More than 2,700 people were killed when Al Qaeda terrorists hijacked US passenger jets and flew them into the twin towers in New York. Workers unfolded an American flag on May, 25, 2002, on top of the last standing beam at the site of the World Trade Center disaster in New York a few days before the official end of the recovery effort. Workers laid the cornerstone of the Freedom Tower on the location of the World Trade Center on July 4, 2004.

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view Ground Zero: September 11, 2001 - September 11, 2011 as presented by: Boston Big Picture


An Army investigation has found that potentially hundreds of remains at Arlington National Cemetery have been misidentified or misplaced, in a scandal marring the reputation of the nation’s pre-eminent burial ground for its honored dead since the Civil War. Army Secretary John McHugh announced Thursday that the cemetery’s two civilian leaders would be forced to step aside, and he appointed a new chief to conduct a more thorough investigation to examine the graves and sort out the mix-up. “I deeply apologize to the families of the honored fallen resting in that hallowed ground who may now question the care afforded to their loved ones,” McHugh told a Pentagon news conference. Arlington National Cemetery is considered among the nation’s most hallowed burial sites, with more than 300,000 people buried there with military honors. An average of 30 funerals are conducted there every day. Among those buried at the cemetery are troops killed in Iraq and Afghanistan, as well service members from past conflicts dating back to the Civil War. A member of the Marine Corps honor guard holds an American flag during bural services for Sgt. Justin Walsh, United States Marine Corps, at Arlington National Cemetery October 24, 2006 in Arlington, Virginia. Sgt. Walsh, from Cuyahoga Falls, Ohio, was wounded while defusing a bomb in Iraq and later died at Walter Reed Army Medical Center in Washington, DC. More U.S. troops have died in Iraq in October than in any other month of the year.

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view On War: Bodies Misidentified, Misplaced At Arlington as presented by: Denver Post



The Kings are busy defending their 2012 Stanley Cup title. They defeated the St. Louis Blues in the first round and have won the first two games of their second-round series against the San Jose Sharks. Two more victories and they would face either the Detroit Red Wings or the Chicago Blackhawks in the Western Conference finals. Times photographer Robert Gauthier has covered the Kings for several years and describes the atmosphere: “Hockey isn’t the most popular sport in America. But to those who follow it, it’s like a religion. The energy at Staples Center is always at a high level whenever the Kings are playing. Despite our limited points of view (we either shoot through a small hole in the glass, or halfway up in the seats), the action is nonstop, and our goal is not only to always tell the story with our photos but to capture the intensity, grace and brutality of these men pursuing their life’s goal of winning the Stanley Cup.”

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view Kings Road: Defending the Stanley Cup as presented by: Los Angeles Times


More than 1,000 Muslims who fled Myanmar's latest bout of sectarian violence huddled Thursday in a Buddhist monastery guarded by army soldiers as calm returned to this northeastern city, though burned out buildings leveled by Buddhist rioters still smoldered. The army transported terrified Muslim families by the truckload out of a neighborhood in Lashio where overturned cars and motorcycles that had been charred a day earlier left black scars on the red earth. "We heard things could get worse, so we waved down soldiers and asked them for help," said 59-year-old Khin Than, who arrived at the monastery Thursday morning with her four children and sacks of luggage along with several hundred other Muslims. "We left because we're afraid of being attacked." The violence in Lashio this week highlights how anti-Muslim unrest has slowly spread across Myanmar since starting last year in western Rakhine state and hitting the central city of Meikhtila in March. President Thein Sein's government, which inherited power from the military two years ago, has been heavily criticized for failing to contain the violence.

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view Fearful Myanmar Muslims Shelter in Monastery as presented by: Sacramento Bee


The latest research suggests troops handle battlefield stress better, and avoid post-war problems more often, when they heal among their comrades. On a base in Afghanistan, Marines on the front lines help a comrade cope with his best friend’s death. A portrait of Cpl. Chad Wade hangs in 1st Platoon’s command post at Patrol Base Hernandez . Cpl. Wade was killed in December by a bomb buried on the path he was patrolling. The rest of the platoon rallied around Lance Cpl. Voie, just the kind of front-line, buddy-to-buddy intervention the Marine Corps is trying to institutionalize to avoid post-traumatic stress disorder among the troops. Here, 1st Squad leader Sgt. Albert Tippett, left, and Lance Cpl. Voie smoke and hang out with other Marines in the squad’s hooch. A Marine from 2nd Battalion raises the flag at Patrol Base Hernandez. The battalion was one of three in Afghanistan to have gone through the new combat-stress training before shipping out from the U.S.

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view Marines Rally Around Friend as presented by: Wall Street Journal


Celebrating the coming Chinese New Year or Spring Festival, the most important Chinese transitional festival, which falls on 03 February 2011 as the Year of rabbit.

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view Year of the Rabbit as presented by: GigaPica


Terror returned to the heart of Russia, with two deadly suicide bombings on the Moscow subway at rush hour, including an attack at the station beneath the headquarters of the secret police. At least 38 people were killed and more than 60 wounded in Monday morning's blasts, the first such attacks in Moscow in six years. Russian police have killed several Islamic militant leaders in the North Caucasus recently, including one last week in the Kabardino-Balkariya region, which raised fears of retaliatory strikes and escalating bloodshed by the militants. A woman cries near the flowers and candles placed in memory of the subway blast victims at the Lubyanka Subway station, which was earlier hit by an explosion, Moscow, Monday, March 29. Two explosions blasted Moscow's subway system Monday morning as it was jam-packed with rush-hour passengers, killing at least 37 people, emergency officials and news agencies said. Russian Prime Minister Vladimir Putin speaks with a survivor of the metro bomb explosions as he visits Botkinskaya hospital in Moscow, Monday, March 29.

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view Russian Subway Bombing as presented by: Sacramento Bee



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