Gallery Gate

Hay fever sufferers can now see the face of their invisible enemy - thanks to these Scanning Electron Microscope images of pollen grains. A Swiss scientists named Martin Oeggerli, who uses the name Micronaut for his art, uses a Scanning Electron Microscope in his cellar to capture images of pollen grains. This picture shows a grain of willow pollen wedged between flower petals. Birch pollen, one of the most common causes of hay fever in Britain. Birch trees release their pollen between March and May, and hay fever sufferers are likely to experience the worst symptoms during April. Pollen from a forget-me-not. This flower has one of the smallest known grains of pollen; just five one-thousandths of a millimetre in diameter. Up to half of the British population suffer from hay fever, which is caused by the immune system reacting to the pollen. Cells inside the nose and eyes release histamine and other chemicals when they come in contact with pollen, causing red eyes and a blocked nose.

Share/Bookmark

view Hayfever Sufferers, Know Your Enemy: Scanning Electron Microscope Pictures Of Pollen as presented by: Telegraph Media Group


After a month of heavy rain saturated mountainsides, a fresh deluge sent landslides sweeping into Seoul last week, killing 59 people. Ten were still reported missing. In a strange compounding of the misery, the landslides and flash flooding washed away landmines buried near an air defense unit in Seoul. Soldiers were searching for those landmines as well as North Korean landmines washed away near the border. A total of 76 landslides of different severity struck after the most intense rainstorm in Korea in the last century. Ten university students lost their lives while volunteering at a summer camp for kids when a landslide struck in Chuncheon. "If it keeps raining like this, no country in the world can endure this," South Korean President Lee Myung-bak said. Rescue workers remove a body from a collapsed house after a landslide caused by heavy rainfall. Damaged cars pile up after a landslide and heavy rainfall in Seoul July 27, 2011. Wild weather has battered the peninsula, causing widespread flooding and transport delays, while the share price of insurers fell on fears that damage costs would run into millions of dollars.

Share/Bookmark

view South Korean Deluge as presented by: Boston Big Picture


For many, photographs from the World War II have only been seen in grainy black and white. But now, new colour images have emerged that show the full horror of the destruction inflicted by Nazi bombings across London. The powerful images were released to mark the 70th anniversary of the launch of Winston Churchill's 'V for Victory' campaign on July 19, 1941. In this extraordinary picture, the double-decker bus is still visible amid crumbling tarmac and bent girders left in an enormous crater caused by a bomb which landed in the middle of a Balham high street, south London. A symbol of resilience: The Houses of Parliament with part of them covered in scaffolding are seen across the River Thames on a sunny day in 1941. The random nature of the bombing is clearly demonstrated here as a church, right, remains untouched while a vast swathe of buildings close by were reduced to rubble.

Share/Bookmark

view Amazing Color Pictures Of London Under Siege From Nazi Bombers During World War II as presented by: Daily Mail Online



Schieffer received his life-saving heart transplant on May 25, 1988, and a rebirthday celebration was held in his honor at the hospital Friday morning May 24, 2013 with family, friends and hospital staff. He holds a photograph of Jason White, the young man who died in a accident and whose heart was transplanted into Schieffer. A rebirthday celebration was held in his honor at the hospital Friday morning May 24, 2013 with family, friends and hospital staff. Granddaughter Katie Cox signs a rebirthday card for her grandfather Twain Schieffer who celebrates 25 years and the longest living heart transplant recipient in Central Texas. Austin resident Twain Schieffer, left, embraces Dr. John Oswalt, right, the surgeon who performed his heart transplant surgery 25 years ago at Seton Medical Center Austin at a celebration in his honor as being the longest living heart transplant recipient in Central Texas.

Share/Bookmark

view Heart Transplant #14 Has Been a Very Good Number as presented by: The Statesman


On the edge of the Arctic Circle lies Facebook's newest data center. Located in Luleå, Sweden, the new centre is now handling live traffic from around the world. All the equipment inside is powered by locally generated hydro-electric energy. In addition to harnessing the power of water, Facebook is using the chilly Nordic air to cool the thousands of servers storing photos, videos, comments, and Likes. Nearly all the technology in the facility, from the servers to the power distribution systems, is based on Open Compute Project designs.

Share/Bookmark

view Inside Facebook's New Arctic Circle Data Center as presented by: Telegraph Media Group


During the past 3 weeks the FINA World Championships have been taking place in Shanghai, China. We already showed you the funny faces, but there has been some serious diving, swimming and dancing competition going on in the pools. Alexander Dale Oen of Norway reacts after winning the men's 100m breaststroke final. Hungary's Villo Kormos and Zsofia Reisinger compete during the preliminary round of the women's 10m synchronised platform diving event. Italy's Federica Pellegrini reacts after winning the women's 200m freestyle final.

Share/Bookmark

view The FINA World Championships as presented by: Totally Cool Pix


Driven by the forces of sexual selection, male—and, in some instances, female—animals have evolved a dizzying array of mating displays and rituals. For jumping spiders, mating can be an tricky affair—but not for the reasons you might think. According to a recent study published in Current Biology, jumping spiders communicate during courtship using ultraviolet B (UVB) light, which humans are unable to see. While scientists have long known that certain species use UVA light for communication, this was the first study to demonstrate that some are also able to detect shorter-wavelength UVB light. The male jumping spiders have specialized scales that glow white and green when exposed to UV light; in female spiders, the palps appeared green under UV light. And the absence of UVB light effectively killed the mood: As soon as either sex was exposed to light without ultraviolet rays, the other immediately lost interest in mating. While this male mandrill may look unfriendly, mandrills are social animals that live in large groups in Africa’s rainforests. Each pack is led by a dominant, alpha male. These brightly colored, or “fatted” alpha males—as seen in this picture—are the only ones to sire offspring, and have much higher levels of testosterone than the paler, “non-fatted” males. The red color on the male’s face and genitalia also indicate its dominance within the group. What the male fiddler crabs lack in body size, he more than makes up for in claws. The large claw, or cheliped—which looks like a fiddle when moved in conjunction with the smaller claw—is used for communication, courtship, and combat. The smaller claw is used for eating and building a burrow.

Share/Bookmark

view Flash, Deception and Suicide: 10 Remarkable Tricks of Animal Mating as presented by: Discover Magazine


A half moon over Malaysia's landmark Seri Wawasan Bridge in a clear sunset sky above Putrajaya on June 28, 2004. Putrajaya skies were clear on Monday after a week of smoke from forest fires in Indonesia. Weather forecasters said the problem may last until heavy rains come in October. Stephen Quinto, 17, dressed as 'Night Crawler' joins thousands of comic book fans from around the world at the annual four-day Comic Con convention in San Diego, July 19, 2003. Thousands of fans from around the world gather to peruse a collection of comic books and industry related sci-fi, video and motion picture fantasy products. Australian gymnast Monique Blount practices her floor routine during a training session in Sydney May 17, 2004 for the Australian Gymnastics Championships. The championships that start on Tuesday are one of two Olympic trials to determine who will represent Australian at the 2004 Olympic Games in Athens.

Share/Bookmark

view 32 Shades Of Blue as presented by: Totally Cool Pix



view our privacy policy & terms of service