Gallery Gate

Minnesota native Mark Heithoff ‘s series of images of Lake Minnetonka, called “The Lake,” is currently showing at the Burnet Gallery at Le Méridien Chambers Minneapolis through September 8, 2013. Lake Minnetonka was named in 1852, and its name came from the Sioux Indian words minne (water) and tonka (big). Rightly so, as the lake covers almost 22 square miles, with many bays, peninsulas and islands, providing lots of scenic views and attracting loads of visitors. Heitoff’s series of images, known as “The Lake,” was photographed from the bow of his parents’ boat over a period of four years (2006-2009). Out of the estimated 1500 photographs Heitoff produced, only 18 images were selected for the Burnet Gallery show. “The Lake” was made into a photo book of the same name in 2012.

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view Life on the Lake as presented by: Photo District News


As we all know, Apple Inc. co-founder and former CEO Steve Jobs passed away Oct. 5, at the age of 56 because of pancreatic cancer. It was a sad day for everyone who loved his work. Presenting a tribute to Steve with this selection of artistic portraits. I hope you like these.

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view Steve Jobs – The Artistic Tribute as presented by: Viral Blender


Stress is something people can hardly avoid in this modern life. Everyone had experienced stress before and they would always like to find a way to relieve the stress. There are many ways for people to relieve their stress and there is someone who offered to help other people relieve it in a unique way. Nate Hill, a 33-year-old performance artist put on a panda costume and asked people to punch him in the stomach for stress relieve. He named his project as Punch-Me-Panda. Artist Nate Hill dresses as Punch Me Panda and invites abuse for a penny per punch in Brooklyn, N.Y., on Wednesday. Punch Me Panda offers to let people get out their frustration and aggression one punch at a time. Punch Me Panda takes a break at a nearby deli.

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view Punch Me Panda as presented by: Wall Street Journal



In the summer and autumn of 1940, Germany's Luftwaffe conducted thousands of bombing runs, attacking military and civilian targets across the United Kingdom. Hitler's forces, in an attempt to achieve air superiority, were preparing for an invasion of Britain code-named "Operation Sea Lion." At first, they targeted only military and industrial targets. But after the Royal Air Force hit Berlin with retaliatory strikes in September, the Germans began bombing British civilian centers. Some 23,000 British civilians were killed in the months between July and December 1940. Thousands of pilots and air crews engaged in battle in the skies above Britain, Germany, and the English Channel, each side losing more than 1,500 aircraft by the end of the year. Prime Minister Winston Churchill, speaking of the British pilots in an August speech, said, "Never in the field of human conflict was so much owed by so many to so few." The British defenses held, and Operation Sea Lion was quietly canceled in October, though bombing raids continued long after. Workmen fit a set of paraboloids in a sound detector for use by anti-aircraft batteries guarding England, in a factory somewhere in England, on July 30, 1940. A Nazi Heinkel He 111 bomber flies over London in the autumn of 1940. The Thames River runs through the image. A ninety minute exposure taken from a Fleet Street rooftop during an air raid in London, on September 2, 1940. The searchlight beams on the right had picked up an enemy raider. The horizontal marks across the image are from stars and the small wiggles in them were caused by the concussions of anti-aircraft fire vibrating the camera. The German pilot released a flare, which left a streak across the top left, behind the steeple of St. Bride's Church.

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view World War II: The Battle of Britain as presented by: The Atlantic


Kindergarten kids' drawings that depict children killing U.S. soldiers hang on the wall at Kaeson Kindergarten in central Pyongyang on March 9, 2013. For North Koreans, the systematic indoctrination of anti-Americanism starts as early as kindergarten. North Korean women descend the steps of Mansu Hill in Pyongyang after bowing beneath the feet of two statues to pay respects to their late leaders Kim Il Sung and Kim Jong Il. North Korean hospital staff use traditional Koryo-style medicine to treat a man suffering from chronic stomach pain at Pyongyang Medical College on February 21, 2013. Both modern and traditional styles of healing have long been uniquely intertwined across North Korea, with doctors from both schools working in tandem under one roof.

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view North Korea In Widescreen: Panoramas of life and landscapes in North Korea as presented by: National Geographic


On May 26, 2011, notorious war fugitive Ratko Mladic was arrested in a village in northern Serbia. The former Bosnian Serb general is accused of overseeing the worst massacre in Europe since the end of World War II. He was indicted 16 years ago for his role in the 1995 slaughter of 8,000 Muslim men and boys in Srebenica and for war crimes in the four-year siege of Sarajevo that killed 10,000, including 1,500 children. He will face genocide charges in The Hague. The arrest is a reminder of the atrocities that occurred during the Balkan conflict. International forensic experts examine dozens of bodies in a mass grave in the Serb entity of Pilicer, Bosnia, in a Sept. 18, 1996, file photo. They are believed to be some of the 8,000 missing persons who fled Srebrenica in July 1995. Bosnian Serb wartime general Ratko Mladic was arrested in Serbia on May 26, 2011, after being found in a farmhouse owned by a cousin, a police official said. wo pictures show Ratko Mladic: Left, in uniform as Bosnian Serb Army chief on Feb. 15, 1994, and, right, during a court appearance in Belgrade on May 27, 2011, hours after his arrest ended a 16-year manhunt for the general accused of masterminding the 1995 Srebrenica massacre.

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view Bosnian Serb War Fugitive Ratko Mladic Captured as presented by: Boston Big Picture


Graduation season is well underway, with kindergartners, high schoolers, college seniors and graduate students alike donning caps and gowns to celebrate their achievement. With their diplomas, graduates also get words of wisdom from a commencement speakers and a good excuse to celebrate. Seniors of Service High School watch balloons drop from above at the conclusion of their graduation ceremony on May 15 at the Sullivan Arena in Anchorage, Alaska. Ceremonies for graduates in the Anchorage School District began on May 8 and continue through May 23. University of Minnesota, Rochester student Lauren Smith of Allen Park, Mich., takes an iPhone self portrait before graduation ceremony at the Mayo Civic Center on May 18 in Rochester, Minn. Kindergarteners, from the left, Xykyvonna Martin, Deyonna Vanerson, Lahery Varnado, and Santonio Washington, wait to enter the McComb High School Auditorium on May 21 for the kindergarten graduation ceremony at McComb High School in McComb, Miss.

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view Graduation season 2013 as presented by: Boston Big Picture


Pope Francis urged Catholics to resist the "ephemeral idols" of money, power and pleasure in celebrating the first public Mass of his initial international foreign journey as pontiff during an emotional visit to one of the most important shrines in Latin America. Thousands packed into the huge Basilica of the Shrine of Our Lady of Aparecida, tucked into an agricultural region of verdant fields halfway between Rio and Sao Paulo, and tens of thousands more braved a cold rain outside to catch a glimpse of the first pope from the Americas returning to a shrine of great meaning to the continent and him personally. Before the Mass, Francis stood in silent prayer in front of the 15-inch-tall image of the Virgin of Aparecida, the "Black Mary," his eyes tearing up as he breathed heavily. It was a deeply personal moment for this pontiff, who has entrusted his papacy to the Virgin Mary and, like many Catholics in Latin America, places great importance in devotion to Mary.

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view Pope Celebrates First Mass of his Foreign Journey as presented by: Sacramento Bee



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