Gallery Gate

North Korea renewed its long-standing demand Wednesday that Washington abandon its "hostile policy" toward Pyongyang as the U.S. and South Korea held a fourth day of joint military drills. The exercises, led by the USS George Washington supercarrier and involving hundreds of South Korean and U.S. ships and aircraft, were staged as a response to the sinking of a South Korean warship in March. Forty-six sailors died in the sinking of the Cheonan off the Koreas' west coast. A five-nation team of investigators traced it back to a North Korean torpedo, and South Korea called it the worst attack on its military since the 1950-53 Korean War. This week's drills were intended to warn Pyongyang that Seoul and Washington will not tolerate further acts of aggression, military officials said. Pyongyang, which denies attacking the Cheonan, sees the naval maneuvers as proof that Washington is preparing to invade North Korea -- which the U.S. denies. South Koreans on a hilltop park look at the U.S. nuclear-powered aircraft carrier USS George Washington at the Busan port in Busan, south of Seoul, South Korea, Saturday, July 24, 2010. U.S. Navy and South Korean ships sail in a 13-ship formation led by the Los Angeles-class attack submarine USS Tuscon (SSN 770) on July 26, 2010 in the East Sea off of the Korean peninsula. The United States and South Korea are conducting the combined alliance maritime and air readiness exercise "Invincible Spirit" in the seas east of the Korean peninsula from July 25-28, 2010. This is the first in a series of joint military exercises that will occur over the coming months in the East and West Seas. North Korean soldiers look at a South Korean soldier during the 57th anniversary of signing the ceasefire agreement ceremony on July 27, 2010 in Panmunjom, South Korea. United States and South Korea are operating a joint military exercise while marking 57th anniversary of signing the ceasefire agreement of Korean War between 1950 to 1953.

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view South Korea And U.S. Hold Joint Military Exercises as presented by: Sacramento Bee


Apple co-founder and visionary Steve Jobs died yesterday at the age of 56. Jobs was a man with extraordinary vision, drive, and success; and the technology he helped create has touched and enriched the lives of billions. He focused on creating things of simplicity and beauty matched by an underlying power and utility. When composing this entry, I was surprised to find myself so moved. Coming across the photo of a young Steve introducing the Apple II computer, I remembered learning to program on it. From Basic to Assembly Language, it was on Apple machines that I first developed the key skills I use in my work to this very day. All those years ago, as a high-school kid, my life was enriched by Jobs' efforts, and it continues to be today. Gathered here are images of Steve Jobs, along with a few remembrances from around the world. The first photo is especially striking, because you see in it not only Steve as a proud CEO walking the stage at the top of his game, but as a human being, a simple silhouette of the man who inspired so many. This 1977 file photo shows Apple co-founder Steve Jobs as he introduces the new Apple II in Cupertino, California. Apple CEO Steve Jobs holds up the new MacBook Air after giving the keynote address at the Apple MacWorld Conference in San Francisco, Tuesday, Jan. 15, 2008. A Malaysian takes a photograph with an iPhone on a signboard to pay tribute to Steve Jobs, the Apple founder and former CEO, at an Apple computer outlet in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, on October 6, 2011.

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view Steve Jobs, 1955-2011 as presented by: The Atlantic


For hundreds of years, a spinal injury meant never walking again. Now researchers know the spine can learn. The paralyzed have hope. Exhausting new therapies teach the spine to have a mind of its own. The Denver Post’s in-depth project “Stepping Toward Hope” chronicles the efforts of remarkable patients suffering spinal-cord injuries taking advantage of new science and locomotor therapy that may allow them to walk again. Intense struggles, aching despair and remarkable effort are all part of their grueling stories explored by Denver Post photographers Craig Walker, AAron Ontiveroz and R.J. Sangosti. Karen Gorden said her daughter, Mackenzie, loved the pool workouts because of the freedom, and the chance to more closely approximate walking at Craig Hospital. "Gravity is not working against her," Karen said. Mackenzie Gorden’s teenage life somersaulted last year when she swerved to avoid a deer near her Iowa hometown and rolled her pickup truck into a ditch. The cheerleader had her neck rebuilt at Minnesota’s Mayo Clinic, but Mackenzie has now come to Colorado twice for extensive, intensive therapy sessions aimed at teaching her spine and legs to walk again despite an injured connection to her brain. For James Nall a crawling exercise is his toughest task at Craig Hospital in Englewood, CO. "You gotta crawl before you can walk. I gotta retrain everything. I'm like a giant kid -- a big baby." Nall’s fast-moving life as a restaurant manager, runner and fun-loving friend came to a sharp halt on a routine trip to his basement laundry room a few years ago. Despite the grimacing and pain, James was pleasantly surprised at his first October attempt to walk after a summer break from intensive physical therapy at Craig Hospital. With the aid of therapists and electrical stimulation on his right knee, he took three laps around the gym. "Psychologically and emotionally, that's a huge lift," he said. "It's awesome. It made my freakin' week."

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view Stepping Towards Hope, Photos of Perseverance in Colorado as presented by: Denver Post



The U.S. death toll has mounted in recent weeks as American troops try to extend their reach in the southern provinces of Kandahar and Helmand, while insurgents have mounted a summer counteroffensive aimed at both international troops and the Afghan government. June was the deadliest month for U.S. and international forces with the deaths of 103 service members, including 60 Americans. Including Monday’s deaths, 57 NATO troops have been killed so far this month in Afghanistan, 42 of them American. As combat operations begin to escalate near Kandahar, the 101st Airborne MEDEVAC unit transports casualties of war as well as sick and injured local residents to Kandahar Role 3 Hospital at Kandahar Air Field in Kandahar, Afghanistan. The hospital, one of the most advanced in the country, recently moved into a modern, custom-built fortified building on the sprawling airbase that serves as the nerve center for the NATO military effort in southwestern Afghanistan. U.S. Army Staff Sgt. Cole Reece from Charlie Co. Sixth Battalion, 101st Airborne Combat Aviation Brigade, Task Force Shadow wipes his forehead while tending to U.S. Army Sgt. Jonathan Duralde of Bravo Troop 1-71 CAV after he was injured by an IED blast. A U.S. Navy corpsman stands in a pool of blood while tending to a solider that was wounded by an IED blast at the Kandahar Role 3 Hospital July 12, 2010 at Kandahar Air Field in Kandahar, Afghanistan.

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view Medical Teams Treat The Casualties of War in Afghanistan as presented by: Denver Post


A protester takes cover during clashes with security forces in Ankara, Turkey. Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan on Sunday rejected claims that he is a "dictator," dismissing protesters as an extremist fringe, even as thousands returned to the landmark Istanbul square that has become the site of the fiercest anti-government outburst in years. Protesters shout slogans during a solidarity demonstration for the protests in Istanbul in front of the Turkish Consulate in the Northern Greek city of Thessaloniki.

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view Anti-Government demonstrations in Turkey as presented by: Telegraph Media Group


More than 40 miles of dikes are in danger of overflowing in an eastern Chinese province where floods have caused $1.2 billion in losses, authorities said Monday as the country neared a critical point in battling seasonal rains. Heavy rains pounded Zhejiang province over the weekend, and the level of a river that passes through Lanxi city has risen sharply, said Zhao Fayuan, deputy director of the provincial flood control headquarters. The level of Lanjiang river has now hit 110 feet (34 meters), the highest since 1966, the headquarters said. Recent flooding has destroyed 600,000 acres (241,600 hectares) of farmland and caused 1,846 companies to stop production in Zhejiang, incurring 7.69 billion yuan ($1.19 billion) in direct economic losses, the flood control agency said. Of these, 3.4 billion yuan were agricultural losses. Residents walk past houses destroyed by a landslide triggered by torrential rain in Zhanqiao township of Linxiang city in south China's Hunan province. A man on a motor scooter makes his way through floodwater in Yingtan, east China's Jiangxi Province on June 19, 2011. A man tries to hold up a woman after stepping into a drain while attempting to walk through flood waters in southwestern China's Chongqing Municipality on Friday, June 17, 2011.

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view Flooding in China Continues as Dikes Near Overflowing as presented by: Sacramento Bee


Are you enjoying the warm weather this summer has to offer for us? We made a gallery wit pictures relating the ongoing heatwaves around the world. Children cool down in a channel during a hot day in Minsk. Car mechanic Neil Watson takes dog Max paddle boarding during the hot, sunny weather on Brighton beach in southern England. Haugen, Dunbarand Fernandes from Rosamond, California, cool off in the Pacific ocean during a heat wave in Santa Monica.

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view Heatwaves Around the World as presented by: Totally Cool Pix


French urban climber Alain Robert, also known as the French Spiderman, climbs to the top floor of a 22-story hotel building in Bucharest October 14, 2011. Robert's climb was part of an advertising campaign for a local electronics retailer. Robert first climbed a building at the age of 12 when he got locked out of his apartment and decided to mount the eight stories up to an open window. He has since climbed more than 80 buildings around the world including Chicago's Sears Tower and Taipei 101 in Taiwan.

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view French Spiderman Scales Hotel in Bucharest (Not Safe for Acrophobics) as presented by: Boing Boing



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