Gallery Gate

This 2004 photo released by Belgian police shows exotic frogs from Panama that were discovered by customs officials in film boxes at Brussels national airport. More than 500 amphibian creatures were smuggled into the country by two Belgian citizens to sell on the black market at about 150 euros each. Some of the 150 bottles containing illegal liquid steroids hidden inside sexual lubricant packaging seized by the Australian Customs is seen in this 2008 handout. Customs said that the bottles, labeled as "gay lube oil", actually contained prohibited performance and image enhancing drugs manufactured and sent from Thailand. A Mr Potatohead toy containing 293 grams of ecstasy seized by Australian Customs at a mail center in Sydney, Australia is seen in this undated handout photograph. The parcel was posted from Ireland and sent to a residential address in Sydney's western suburbs.

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view Crazy Contraband: Photo Gallery Of Weird Confiscated Stuff, Including Drugs And Critters as presented by: Boing Boing


On 9 November 2014, Berlin celebrates the 25th anniversary of the Mauerfall. Two cities were united on that faithful night in 1989, effectively clearing the way for Germany to reunite. The Iron Curtain fell, the GDR collapsed and not long after the Soviet Union followed that example. Communism and socialisme gave way to Unionism, and the road ahead brought open borders in Europa, a single currency and wealth beyond belief. Until, of course, the European monetary crisis began in 2008. Added to the current threat of a Cold War revival due to the inflammable situation in Ukraine, Europe is once again reminded that freedom doesn't come cheap. Good thing that we will always have these images of the Wall coming down to remind us what freedom really means.

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view 2014: The Berlin Wall 1961 - 1989 as presented by: GigaPica


With the U.S. troop surge now nearing its peak in Afghanistan, more than 150,000 US and international troops are now on the ground. 64 of those troops lost their lives this month, as forces pushed hard into the southern Kandahar Province, traditionally the heartland of the Taliban. At the same time, preliminary discussions are beginning to take place between the inner circle of President Hamid Karzai and members of the Quetta shura, the leadership group that oversees the Taliban war effort inside Afghanistan. Part of the current coalition strategy is to continue applying pressure on the Taliban in the fields, and encouraging their leaders to participate in hoped-for settlement talks. Collected here are images of the country and conflict over the past month, part of an ongoing monthly series on Afghanistan. Afghan firemen hose down a burning oil tanker after an explosive device planted underneath it exploded, on the Jalalabad-Torkham highway, east of Kabul. Chief of Defense of the Swedish Armed Forces, General Sverker Göranson, place the Medal of Honor on the coffin of Kenneth Wallin, killed in action on an ISAF mission in Mazar-i Sharif in Afghanistan on Saturday, during a ceremony at Arna military airport north of Stockholm, Tuesday Oct. 19, 2010. Wallin was the 6th Swedish soldier killed in action in Afghanistan. Sgt. Thomas James Brennan of Randolph, Massachusetts, from the First Battalion Eighth Marines Alpha Company, smokes a cigarette in his bunk surrounded by photographs of his wife Melinda and their daughter Madison, 2, after a night of rain at the remote outpost of Kunjak in southern Afghanistan's Helmand province.

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view Afghanistan, October, 2010 as presented by: Boston Big Picture



Osama bin Laden is dead. He was 54. The leader of the Al Qaeda terrorist network had eluded capture for a decade since the attacks on September 11, 2001. U.S. forces and CIA operatives killed him in a firefight in his hideout compound in the city of Abbotabad, Pakistan. He was buried at sea. A large, jubilant crowd reacts to the news of Osama bin Laden's death at the corner of Church and Vesey Streets, adjacent to ground zero, during the early morning hours of May 2, in New York City. People read newspapers that carry headlines "Osama bin Laden killed" at a newsstand in Hyderabad, Pakistan on May 2. Revelers wrap themselves in U.S. flags near the White House after President Barack Obama announced that U.S. authorities have recovered the dead body of Al Qaeda leader Osama bin Laden, in the early morning hours in Washington, May 2.

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view Osama bin Laden Killed as presented by: Boston Big Picture


Five years ago, Gina LaVey began documenting female matadors, or las toreras. Through documenting the women’s lifestyles in and out of the ring, LeVay examines the conflict of the female in the midst of a male dominated art and sport steeped in cultural mores. The female matador has faced much opposition in entering the ring, but LeVay brings their strengths and abilities to light. She aims to illuminate the truth of the bullfight for these women by capturing the diametrically opposed elements of brutality and sensuality, drama and harmony that are inherent in this dance of death. LeVay’s exhibition, Bull Fight, is on view at hous projects until June 25, 2011.

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view Bull Fight as presented by: Photo District News


Beneath its design is the engineering of what is arguably the most complicated high-rise to be built in the U.S. Calculated to sway during powerful Santa Anas and absorb ground movement during severe earthquakes, it is wedded aesthetically and technically to the unique footprint of the region. Geologist Rosalind Munro of AMEC, a geotechnical consulting firm, at the Wilshire Grand tower construction site in downtown L.A. Before construction started, Munro went down a borehole eight stories deep to verify the stability of the building site. Construction workers guide a jumping wall form system into place as it is lowered into position by a crane into the core of the Wilshire Grand tower. Remote-controlled booms are used to place concrete with accuracy as workers pour the foundation for the New Wilshire Grand tower.

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view The Grand plan: Building the Wilshire Grand tower as presented by: Los Angeles Times


When dictators are overthrown by rebel or military forces, their many elaborate palaces, mansions and bunkers are evacuated, left behind for the new forces to rummage through. From Saddam Hussein’s palace, Maqar-el-Tharthar, a massive residence at Lake Tharthar, to Moamer Kadhafi’s homes and his families homes scattered throughout Libya, the first peek into their lavish lifestyles come to life as rebels enter each residence. Visitors view the bedroom of Imelda Marcos at the Santo Nino shrine 13 October 2004 that was sequestered by the government. When the former first lady built the mansion in 1981 in her hometown Tacloban, it was dubbed by many as the Malacanang presidential palace of the south. The mansion named after religious icon of the Child Jesus stands as a monument to the obscene excesses of the Marcos years whenthe late dictator Ferdinand Marcos was deposed by military-backed people power revolt in 1986 after 20 years in power. Soldiers stand at attention during a change of command ceremony July 1, 2004 in Camp Victory, Iraq. Gen. Casey took command of the forces from Gen. Sanchez in a change of command ceremony at the elaborate Al-Faw Palace in Camp Victory. Anti-Communist soldier (L) sticks a bayonet through a portrait of late Romanian Communist leader Nicolae Ceausescu 28 December 1989 in Sibiu as the anti-Communist uprising to end Nicolae Ceausescu's 24 years of dictatorial rule continue. The communist dictator N. Ceausescu and his wife Elena were deposed and executed by a firing squad 25 December 1989. Eight years after the December 1989 revolution which toppled Ceausescu, Romania has begun lifting the veil on the "mysteries" surrounding the uprising and the circumstances which brought former president Ion Iliescu to power. According to general prosecutor Sorin Moisescu, reports put about at the time of "terrorists loyal to Ceausescu" provoking bloody diversions to sow panic in the population, were "fabricated" to justify Iliescu's takeover. "Nothing that happened after 22 December 1989 was due to chance. The deaths of some of the demonstrators were supposed to provide legitimacy to the new regime" Moisecu said 24 December 1998.

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view In Focus: The Palaces Left Behind as presented by: Denver Post


Nearly two years ago, a reclusive 70-something-year-old named Janet Schwartz was devastated when the law threatened to separate her from her domesticated deer, Bimbo. Conservation officers arrived at her generator-powered plywood shack, plopped miles away from a remote Canadian tourist town called Ucluelet, with orders to take the then ten-year-old deer into their custody. Janet was told she wasn’t allowed to keep her deer anymore because in this part of Canada, it is illegal to keep wild animals as pets. After weeks of stress and fear, Janet reached out to a few media outlets and told her story. She had rescued the deer when it was only a day old, after her neighbors found it lying in the grass near its mother’s dead body. She named the deer Bimbo after a Gene Autry song (“Bimbo Bimbo where you gonna go-e-o”). Janet had raised a buck years before, so her neighbors knew she could provide a suitable home for the fawn. Janet raised Bimbo on goat’s milk and fruits, allowing her to sleep at her bedside every night for the first two years, until she was strong enough to be tethered to a hut on the property.

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view Janet Schwartz and Bimbo the deer – photographs by Jen Osborne as presented by: Denver Post



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