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A sumptuous blend of modern digital imaging technologies packaged in an old-school-style rangefinder, the Fujifilm X100S is a standout in a crowded field of cameras clamoring for eyeballs and market share. Priced at around $1,300, the 16.3mp X100S is not for everyone. Some shooters wonít appreciate being stuck with a non-interchangeable 23mm prime lens (35mm full frame equivalent) and some will bemoan the price. And itís unlikely that pros will be using it as their main camera on a big shoot. This camera is no DSLR killer. Rather the X100S is a niche camera imbued with so much soul and serious fun that it will be hard to leave home without it. At first feel, the X100S lacks the heftiness of the venerable Leica, but it is well constructed and durable with a die-cast magnesium body wrapped in a grippy synthetic leather material. In traditional silver and black as well as a recently released sleek all black body, the X100S is handsomely compact and unobtrusive. Best of all your back will thank you for leaving the 25-pound Domke bag with the two DSLR bodies and lenses at home. At 15.7 ounces, this camera at times feels too light, and you almost forget itís on your neck until the moment you reach for it, when the perfect light hits the pretty girl in the Paris cafe as she is perfectly framed in the rustic doorway.

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view The Fujifilm X100S as presented by: Los Angeles Times


This coming Sunday, the final match of the 2011 FIFA Women's World Cup will take place in Frankfurt, Germany, as teams from Japan and the United States vie for the championship. Sixteen teams from around the world initially qualified for the tournament, and began playing the first round of matches in nine different arenas across Germany. This year will mark Japan's debut in the final, as the U.S. team, led by Hope Solo and Abby Wambach, tries to become the first national squad to win three Women's World Cup titles. Collected here are some images from this year's championship, from June 26 through July 17. Hope Solo of USA controls the ball during the Women's World Cup 2011 Group C match between USA and Colombia at Rhein-Neckar-Arena, on July 2, 2011 in Sinsheim, Germany. Japan's Homare Sawa listens to her nation's national anthem prior to the group B match between Japan and Mexico. Hope Solo of USA controls the ball during the Women's World Cup 2011 Group C match between USA and Colombia at Rhein-Neckar-Arena, on July 2, 2011 in Sinsheim, Germany.

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view Women's World Cup 2011 as presented by: The Atlantic


The autumnal equinox took place on September 22, marking the end of summer and the start of fall across the Northern Hemisphere. Autumn is the season of harvests, festivals, migrations, winter preparations, and of course, spectacular foliage. Across the north, people are beginning to feel a crisp chill in the evening air, leaves are reaching peak color, apples and pumpkins are being gathered, and animals are on the move. Collected here are some early images from this year's autumn -- more will come later as the season unfolds. Alexander Kempt paddles past the Baroque Palace in a hollowed out pumpkin as he takes part in the German Pumpkin Boat Championship on September 16, 2012 in Ludwigsburg, Germany. The 40 participants of the competition may either use one of the pumpkin boats furnished by the organizers or are allowed to use a self-made boat constructed of a pumpkin weighing 200 kilograms or more. Leaves along the Androscoggin River are at peak color in Berlin, New Hampshire, on September 28, 2012. Autumn colors and mountains of the Teton Range, photographed in Grand Teton National Park, Wyoming.

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view Fall Is in the Air as presented by: The Atlantic



Chinese Premier Wen Jiabao on Wednesday ordered a sweeping and transparent probe into the weekend collision between two bullet trains that killed at least 39 people and raised public anger about the government's handling of the accident. Facts must be uncovered, responsible parties held to account, and investigation results made public, Wen told a cabinet meeting, according to a news release posted to the government's official website. Six carriages derailed and four fell about 65 to 100 feet (20 to 30 meters) from a viaduct Saturday night after one train plowed into the back of a stalled train. More than 190 people were injured. The government on Tuesday ordered a two-month safety campaign for its railway system amid questions about how the crash occurred. Chinese rescuers work around the wreckage of train cars in Wenzhou in east China's Zhejiang province, Sunday, July 24, 2011. bullet train passes over the wrecked carriages involved in Saturday's crash. In this photo released by China's Xinhua News Agency, relatives of the victims in Saturday's train crash cry after seeing the bodies of their loved ones in a funeral home in Wenzhou.

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view China Premier Orders Probe Into Deadly Train Crash as presented by: Sacramento Bee


Signs of normality began to return to Oslo on Monday after the peaceful, liberal country was stunned on Friday by the bombing in downtown Oslo and the shooting massacre at a youth camp outside the capital. Over the weekend, Oslo mourned the victims. Norway's King Harald V and his wife Queen Sonja and Prime Minister Jens Stoltenberg crowded into Oslo Cathedral on Sunday, where the pews were packed, and people spilled into the plaza outside the building. The area was strewn with flowers and candles, and people who could not fit in the grand church huddled under umbrellas in a drizzle. Afterward, people sobbed and hugged one another in the streets, as many lingered over the memorial of flowers and candles. The royal couple and prime minister later visited the site of the bombing in Oslo. People light candles in memory of the victims of the attacks on Norway's government headquarters and an island youth retreat, as they pay their respects at Oslo Cathedral, Sunday, July 24, 2011. Relatives of a victim gather to observe a minute's silence on a campsite jetty on the Norwegian mainland, across the water from Utoya island, seen in the background on Monday, July 25, 2011. People have been placing floral tributes at this site in memory of those killed in the shooting massacre on the island on Friday. Women react at the end of a memorial service at Oslo Cathedral in the aftermath of the Friday attacks on Norway's government headquarters and a youth retreat.

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view Stunned Norway Mourns Assault Victims as presented by: Sacramento Bee


World Naked Bike Ride (WNBR) is an international clothing-optional bike ride in which participants plan, meet and ride together en masse on human-powered transport (the vast majority on bicycles, but some on skateboards and inline skates), to "deliver a vision of a cleaner, safer, body-positive world." The dress code motto is "Bare as you dare". Full and partial nudity is encouraged, but not mandatory, on all rides. Any mandate to cover intimate parts is forbidden; this is a distinguishing feature of WNBR against other cycling events. Creative expression is also encouraged to generate a fun and immersive atmosphere during the ride, capture the attention and imagination of the public and media, and make the experience more personalized and fulfilling for the riders. Body art, such as body painting, are common forms of creative expression, as well as costumes, art bikes, portable sound reinforcement systems (such as public address systems, bullhorns and boomboxes) and musical instruments or other types of noisemaker. Cyclists ride during the World Naked Bike Ride in Mexico City. More photos from around the world, probably "NSFW," depending on where you "W."

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view Naked Bike Ride Day Around The World as presented by: Boing Boing


Peter Otieno, 5, stood at a school in Kibera, Kenyaís largest slum, Monday. He is infected with HIV and both his parents died of AIDS. The preschool is managed by the Nyanyo Project, which works to empower grandparents who care for their HIV-positive grandchildren. A man pulled his bicycle at a parking area outside a railway station in Tachikawa, western Tokyo. Volunteers David Patterson and Matthew Poorman searched a dumpster Tuesday in Holiday City, Ohio, for three brothers who have been missing since a Thanksgiving Day visit to their fatherís home: Andrew Skelton, 9, Alexander Skelton, 7, and Tanner Skelton, 5. Their father, John Skelton, has tried to hang himself and police said he lied to them.

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view Photos of the Day: Nov. 30 as presented by: Wall Street Journal


Boing Boing readers following the violent convulsions of the drug war in Mexico, and fans of the AMC narco-drama Breaking Bad, will likely find these photos from a secret Mexican meth lab to be of interest (particularly in light of the TV show's most recent episode, "Salud.") I can't find Jesse, Mike, Gus, or Heisenberg in any of these photosóbut then, these images shot just today are the real thing. Above: a full-face respirator gas mask hangs on a wall above plastic containers at the clandestine drug laboratory discovered in Zapotlanejo, on the outskirts of Guadalajara, September 23, 2011. Soldiers found 133 tons of a drug catalyst used in crystal methamphetamine production (phenylacetic acid, perhaps?) and 180 kg of crystal meth ready for consumption at the laboratory located on a ranch about 38 km (24 miles) east of Guadalajara, according to a local media. The meth is no "Blue Sky," by the looks of it, and the modest gear would look out of place at the Pollos Hermanos superlab. Surely Jesse would not approve of the conditions, and it looks to be below even Don Eladio's standards. But again: this is real life.

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view Inside A Clandestine Mexican Meth Lab as presented by: Boing Boing



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