Gallery Gate

Driven by the forces of sexual selection, male—and, in some instances, female—animals have evolved a dizzying array of mating displays and rituals. For jumping spiders, mating can be an tricky affair—but not for the reasons you might think. According to a recent study published in Current Biology, jumping spiders communicate during courtship using ultraviolet B (UVB) light, which humans are unable to see. While scientists have long known that certain species use UVA light for communication, this was the first study to demonstrate that some are also able to detect shorter-wavelength UVB light. The male jumping spiders have specialized scales that glow white and green when exposed to UV light; in female spiders, the palps appeared green under UV light. And the absence of UVB light effectively killed the mood: As soon as either sex was exposed to light without ultraviolet rays, the other immediately lost interest in mating. While this male mandrill may look unfriendly, mandrills are social animals that live in large groups in Africa’s rainforests. Each pack is led by a dominant, alpha male. These brightly colored, or “fatted” alpha males—as seen in this picture—are the only ones to sire offspring, and have much higher levels of testosterone than the paler, “non-fatted” males. The red color on the male’s face and genitalia also indicate its dominance within the group. What the male fiddler crabs lack in body size, he more than makes up for in claws. The large claw, or cheliped—which looks like a fiddle when moved in conjunction with the smaller claw—is used for communication, courtship, and combat. The smaller claw is used for eating and building a burrow.

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view Flash, Deception and Suicide: 10 Remarkable Tricks of Animal Mating as presented by: Discover Magazine


Their homelands are torn by war, economic distress, political strife, or environmental collapse. They choose to leave, or have no choice. They're called migrants, refugees, or internally displaced people. The labels are inadequate as often circumstances could allow all three descriptions, or some combination of them. Once in their new countries, they face difficult transitions, discrimination, or outright hostility. Host countries are burdened with the economic and political repercussions of the arrivals, while home nations are sometimes saddled with a "brain drain" of their most important human resources. Immigration is a hot-button issue in the American presidential race, and a wave of new arrivals from Libya to Italy has left the European Union struggling with decisions over the Schengen policy of borderless travel between member nations. Gathered here are images of some of the estimated 214 million people worldwide in the process of redefining what "home" means to them. Tunisian would-be immigrants who were evacuated from the Italian island of Lampedusa to a reception center in Manduria, jump over a fence to escape from the camp on April 1. The Italian government has prepared a plan to accommodate 10,000 migrants on a temporary basis, before repatriating them to Tunisia. Rescuers help people in the sea after a boat carrying some 250 migrants crashed into rocks as they tried to enter the port of Pantelleria, an island off the southern coast of Italy, on April 13. Italy is struggling to cope with a mass influx of immigrants from north Africa, many of whom risk their lives by sailing across the often stormy Meditteranean in makeshift vessels. Syrian soldiers prepare to hand over an elderly Syrian woman to Lebanese army troops as she was found trying to cross the border into northern Lebanon on foot on the Syrian side of the border village of Arida on May 19. The family of the woman had already fled their homes for fear of fresh violence as a result of anti-regime protests in their country, leaving her behind.

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view Immigration as presented by: Boston Big Picture


Minnesota native Mark Heithoff ‘s series of images of Lake Minnetonka, called “The Lake,” is currently showing at the Burnet Gallery at Le Méridien Chambers Minneapolis through September 8, 2013. Lake Minnetonka was named in 1852, and its name came from the Sioux Indian words minne (water) and tonka (big). Rightly so, as the lake covers almost 22 square miles, with many bays, peninsulas and islands, providing lots of scenic views and attracting loads of visitors. Heitoff’s series of images, known as “The Lake,” was photographed from the bow of his parents’ boat over a period of four years (2006-2009). Out of the estimated 1500 photographs Heitoff produced, only 18 images were selected for the Burnet Gallery show. “The Lake” was made into a photo book of the same name in 2012.

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view Life on the Lake as presented by: Photo District News



Tens of thousands of workers marched Wednesday through the streets of Europe, decrying the loss of jobs and benefits they fear will come with stinging austerity measures seeking to contain government debt. Police fired shots in the air to disperse protesters at a general strike in Spain. Greek bus and trolley drivers walked off the job, joined by doctors who staged a 24-hour strike at state hospitals. Unions claimed a crowd of 100,000 marched on European Union headquarters in Brussels. From Ireland to Greece, workers united around the theme that they are victims of a debt crisis caused by reckless high-spending bankers undermining Europe's cherished welfare state. They complained of higher taxes, job cuts, soaring unemployment and smaller pensions. A demonstrator shouts slogans while marching in central Athens on September 29, 2010. Greeks joined the European day of action against the austerity measures. The banner reds "IMF out." Riot police detain protesters in Brussels on Wednesday. A demonstrator throws a plastic object on burning garbage containers in central Barcelona during the general strike held in Spain.

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view Anti-Austerity Protests Sweep Across Europe as presented by: Sacramento Bee


Horseshoe Bend is a picturesque horseshoe-shaped turn in the Colorado River, just South of the town of Page, Arizona. Visitors can reach Horseshoe Bend by taking a short 1/2 mile (0.8 kilometers) hike off US Route 89 to an overlook 1,000 feet (405 meters) above the river. Horseshoe Bend is part of Glen Canyon, which was carved by the Colorado River over a period of 5 million years. Glen Canyon is also home to the beautiful Lake Powell. Horseshoe Bend is popular with photographers and tourists who seek the beautiful canyon scenery.

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view Horseshoe Bend, Colorado River, Arizona, USA as presented by: Beautiful Places To Visit


This month has been the deadliest month yet for foreign troops in Afghanistan. The U.S. Department of Defense now reports that one hundred coalition troops were killed this month. The death toll for 2010 to date now stands at 320. With soldiers and equipment still arriving in the country, peak troop strength is anticipated to reach 150,000 by August. And, with the removal of General Stanley McChrystal from command of Afghanistan following an embarrassing article in Rolling Stone magazine, a shift in leadership is underway with General David Petraeus attending confirmation hearings now. Efforts are now being made ot both weaken the Taliban and pressure them to reconcile with the Afghan government, but progress is slow, and many earlier gains are becoming unstable once more. Collected here are images of the country and conflict over the past month, part of an ongoing monthly series on Afghanistan. Two-year-old Faith Marie Adams reaches for one of the U.S. flags from her father, Army Spc. Christian M. Adams' coffin, during military honors ceremonies at the Main Post Chapel on Fort Huachuca, Arizona on Tuesday, June, 22, 2010. Christian Adams, stationed at Fort Hood, Texas, died in Afghanistan on June 11. A member of a US Army Explosive Ordnance Disposal (EOD) team stands at the entrance to a container wearing a bomb disposal suit prior to an exercise at Camp Nathan Smith in Kandahar City. Sgt. David Guthrie of Grimes, Iowa serving with the U.S. Army's 1-17 Cavalry smiles as he reads a letter that had just arrived from his family at Strongpoint Tarnak on June 14, 2010 in rural Dand District, just south of Kandahar, Afghanistan.

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view Afghanistan, June, 2010 as presented by: Boston Big Picture


Residents and utility crews on Saturday were assessing and repairing the damage from a severe storm on Friday night. The National Weather Service said that the worst damage from the storm was centered in the metro area, with hundreds of trees and power lines down throughout the Twin Cities. In the Highland Park area of St. Paul, cleanup was underway on Saturday, June 22, 2013, after severe thunderstorms caused damage and power failures around the Twin Cities on Friday night. Megan Kellerman of Minneapolis uses her cellphone on Saturday, June 22, 2013 while it charges off the battery of her car, which was crushed by a fallen tree on Humbolt Avenue near 33rd Street in Minneapolis. Numerous large, old trees were uprooted in this neighborhood east of Lake Calhoun and south of Uptown after powerful overnight storms swept through the Twin Cities. Rockville, Minn., Fire Chief Rodney Schaefer stops to take a photo of a downed tree on a home on Friday, June 21, 2013, in Rockville, Minn. The tree crushed an antique tractor. A strong overnight storm caused damage over much of central Minnesota.

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view Aftermath of Severe Storms as presented by: Minnesota Public Radio


Protest marchers called for justice for Trayvon Martin and Terrance Franklin and demands that the Unites States Department of Justice bring civil rights charges against George Zimmerman, Monday evening, July 15, 2013 in Minneapolis. Asa Edwards of Little Canada gathers to protest George Zimmerman's acquittal in the 2012 killing of 17-year-old Trayvon Martin in Florida Monday, July 15, 2013 at the Hennepin County Government Center in downtown Minneapolis. He was there with his son Kaos Edwards, foreground, and wife Regina Edwards, not pictured. The crowd was also protesting police actions in the shooting death of Terrance Franklin in an uptown Minneapolis basement in May. A large crowd gathers Monday evening, July 15, 2013 outside the Hennepin County Government Center to protest George Zimmerman's acquittal in the 2012 killing of 17-year-old Trayvon Martin in Florida. Ashley Martin, right, the mother of Terrance Franklin's son, speaks to people gathered to protest George Zimmerman's acquittal in the 2012 killing of 17-year-old Trayvon Martin in Florida Monday, July 15, 2013 at the Hennepin County Government Center in downtown Minneapolis. They were also protesting police actions in the shooting death of Terrance Franklin in an uptown Minneapolis basement in May.

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view Protesters march for Trayvon Martin, Terrance Franklin as presented by: Minnesota Public Radio



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