Gallery Gate

Large Project 775 landing craft (otherwise known as “Ropucha I”) is a series of Soviet ships designed for landing of troops and loads on the shore. They are the base of the Russian Landing Fleet. Let’s explore their history and go aboard one of them. The Russian Navy had some requirements concerning this type of ships: a large landing craft had to be capable of carrying a battalion, a medium landing craft – a company, and a small landing craft – a platoon. Ironically, all of the already existed medium landing craft didn’t meet these requirements and in 1968 it was decided to design new medium landing craft called Project 775. The new project was designed in Poland thus its main constructor was a Pole. In a process of designing ships were reclassified from medium to large landing craft. The forerunner of the future ships was built in 1974. The first series consisted of 12 ships was finished in 1978 and called “Rapoucha I” in the West. The second series consisted of 16 ships was finished in 1992. They were called “Rapoucha II”. These ships must have been substituted by new Project 778 ships but after the breakup of the USSR, in 1992, both unfinished ships were destroyed. Large Project 775 landing ships were designed exclusively for the Navy of the USSR. None of them was a part of the Navy of any member states of the Warsaw Treaty Organisation. The only exception is the large landing craft given to Yemen in 1979. Besides the transportation of troops and loads Project 775 landing ships can also be used for installation of mine barriers, delivering humanitarian supplies and people’s evacuation from dangerous areas. It is capable of carrying 650 tons and covering the 4700-mile distance in any non-freezing seas and oceans.

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view Russian Large Landing Craft as presented by: English Russia


"It was one of those images that demanded more investigation," says photographer and film maker Andrew Zuckerman of a photo of a macaw that he had shot for his first book, CREATURE. So for his latest project, Zuckerman focused his lenses on birds. "Imagery of birds is found in all ancient art and has been repeatedly used throughout history—I was curious if I could add something to this tradition." The result is the new book BIRD from Chronicle Books, a collection of avian photographs stunning for their brilliant simplicity. Here, DISCOVER presents some high-flying highlights. From the plebeian pigeon to the rarest bird of all. The Spix's macaw, or the little blue macaw, may be the most endangered bird in the world. The last remaining member of its species known to be living in the wild, a lone male, was discovered in Brazil in 1990, but it has not been seen since 2000. Approximately 120 individuals now survive in captive breeding programs. Fifty of these are kept in the Al Wabra Wildlife Preservation in Qatar where Andrew captured them on film. This scarlet macaw is found in the subtropical rainforests of Central and South America. Individual birds can grow up to three feet in length, with nearly half that length consisting of long, tapered tail feathers. here's something special in a blue feather. Unlike feathers of other colors, which are pigmented, bright blue feathers, like these on the vulturine guineafowl, are the result of nanoscale structures in the feather barbs. Microscopic air cavities within the feather barbs are arranged just so to allow coherent light scattering, creating a blue hue. Green feathers are typically the result of a combination of blue structural color and yellow pigments.

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view Stunning High-Speed Photos of Birds as presented by: Discover Magazine


Caves and tunnels have always been part of human life. We've grown more adept at shaping these underground shelters and passages over the millennia, and today we dig for hundreds of reasons. We excavate to find both literal and cultural treasures, digging mines and unearthing archaeological discoveries. We use caverns for stable storage, for entertainment, and for an effective shelter from natural and man-made disasters. And as the planet's surface becomes ever more crowded, and national borders are closed, tunnels provide pathways for our vehicles and for smugglers of every kind. Collected below are some recent subterranean scenes from around the world. Israeli Antiquity Authority archeologist Annete Nagar shows the 2,000-year-old Second Temple period drainage tunnel under Jerusalem's Old City at the west side of the Jewish Wailing Wall on January 25, 2011. Israeli archaeologists have finished work, which started in 2004, on the tunnel that starts at a site near the flashpoint Al-Aqsa mosque compound inside the walls of Jerusalem's Old City, officials said. Tourists visit the Kuha Karuhas pavilion located inside the Phraya Nakhon cave, in the Khao Sam Roi Yot national park, some 300 km south of Bangkok, Thailand, on December 5, 2010. The pavillon was built in 1890 on the occasion of a visit to the cave by King Chulalongkorn, the grand-father of current King Bhumibol Adulyadej. A miner stands in front of a giant drill machine after it broke through at the final section Sedrun-Faido, at the construction site of the NEAT Gotthard Base Tunnel March 23, 2011. The project consists of two parallel single track tunnels, each of a length of 57 km (35 miles).

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view Scenes From Underground as presented by: The Atlantic



Deadly storms struck again yesterday in the states of Arkansas, Oklahoma, and Kansas. It was a storm system that followed the massive, highest-rated EF5 twister that struck Joplin, Mo., on Sunday. The Joplin twister, which killed more than 120 people, is the eighth deadliest storm on record in the United States dating back to 1840. This year's tornado season has produced approximately 1,000 twisters and has taken the lives of more than 300 people. A neighborhood destroyed by a powerful tornado is seen in an aerial photo taken over Joplin. A torn American flag stands in the wreckage of a church in Joplin. Jeannie Owens searches through a family member's destroyed home after a devastating tornado hit Joplin.

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view Severe Weather Continues In Central US as presented by: Boston Big Picture


The world's toughest off-road race, the Dakar Rally, has begun. Top drivers and riders from around the globe will have to negotiate tough terrain but without having time to enjoy the spectacular landscapes of Argentina, Bolivia and Chile. Here is a selection of photographs from this year's race. Nasser Al Attiyah of Qatar and Mathieu Baumel of France for the ALL4 Racing Mini Qatar Rally Team. Toyota's driver Giniel De Villiers of South Africa and co-driver Dirk Von Zitzewitz of Germany

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view Dakar Rally 2015: World's toughest off-road race as presented by: Telegraph Media Group


The proposed mosque near ground zero drew hundreds of fever-pitch demonstrators Sunday, with opponents carrying signs associating Islam with blood, supporters shouting, "Say no to racist fear!" and American flags waving on both sides. The two leaders of the construction project, meanwhile, defended their plans, though one suggested that organizers might eventually be willing to discuss an alternative site. The other, Imam Feisal Abdul Rauf, said during a Middle East trip that the attention generated by the project is actually positive and that he hopes it will bring greater understanding. Around the corner from the cordoned-off old building that is to become a 13-story Islamic community center and mosque, police separated the two groups of demonstrators. There were no reports of physical clashes but there were some nose-to-nose confrontations, including a man and a woman screaming at each other across a barricade under a steady rain. Police separate demonstrators, both against, left, and for the construction of an Islamic Center, August 22, 2010 near the World Trade Center in New York. The rally was held to oppose the construction of an Islamic Center and mosque near Ground Zero. People participate in a rally against a proposed mosque and Islamic community center near ground zero in New York.

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view NYC Mosque Protests as presented by: Sacramento Bee


The Cannery Row landmark, which opened 25 years ago this week, has become one of the state's leading tourist attractions, drawing about 1.8 million visitors yearly. The Monterey Bay Aquarium is located on the site of a former sardine cannery on Cannery Row on the Pacific Ocean shoreline in Monterey, California. It has an annual attendance of 1.8 million and holds 35,000 plants and animals representing 623 species. The aquarium benefits by a high circulation of ocean water which is obtained through pipes which pump it in from Monterey Bay. Among the aquarium's numerous exhibits, two are of particular note: The centerpiece of the Ocean's Edge Wing is a 10 meter (33-foot) high 1.3 million liter tank for viewing California coastal marine life. In this tank, the aquarium was the first in the world to grow live California Giant Kelp using a wave machine at the top of the tank (water movement is a necessary precondition for keeping Giant Kelp, which absorbs nutrients from surrounding water and requires turbidity), allowing sunlight in through the open tank top, and circulation of raw seawater from the Bay. The second exhibit of note is a 4.5 million liter (1.2 million gallon) tank in the Outer Bay Wing which features one of the world's largest single-paned windows (crafted by a Japanese company, the window is actually five panes seamlessly glued together through a proprietary process). Sealife on exhibit includes stingrays, jellyfish, sea otters, an 11 lb. lobster over 50 years old, and numerous other native marine species, which can be viewed above and below the waterline. For displaying jellyfish, the MBA uses an aquarium called a Kreisel tank which creates a circular flow to support and suspend the jellies. Visitors are able to inspect the creatures of the kelp forest at several levels in the building. The aquarium does not house mammals other than otters.

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view Monterey Bay Aquarium Turns 25 as presented by: Los Angeles Times


If you suffer from vertigo, look away now. While some people would find it unbearable to go anywhere near the edge of a cliff, these Chinese workers are building a 3ft-wide road made of wooden planks on the face of one that’s thousands of feet high. Once finished, it is hoped sightseers will flock to here to edge along and admire the views. The 'road' - the width of a dinner table - they’re assembling is on Shifou Mountain in Hunan Province and stands vertical at 90 degrees without any slopes or alcoves. What’s more, the from China's eastern Jiangxi Province toil away on it with what appear to be few if any safety measures.

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view The Workers Building A 3ft-wide Wooden Road On A Vertical Cliff Face as presented by: Daily Mail Online



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