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The winners of the 2013 Sony World Photography Awards have just been announced. Norwegian photographer Andrea Gjestvang was announced as the Photographer of the Year, for her series of portraits of children and youths who survived the July 2011 massacre on the island of Utoeya, outside Oslo. This year's contest attracted more than 122,000 entries from 170 countries. The photographs were judged in six different competition categories, including Professional, Open, and Student Focus. The organizers have been kind enough to share some of their winning images with In Focus, gathered below. A portrait by Andrea Gjestvang, named Photographer of the Year in the 2013 Sony World Photography Awards. The photograph comes from a project called "One day in history" - Portraits of children and youths who survived the massacre on the island of Utoeya outside Oslo (NO) on 22nd of July 2011. "I bear my scars with dignity, because I got them standing for something I believe in," says Ylva Schwenke (15). Ylva from Tromso, hid by a path called "The love path". She was shot in the shoulder, her stomach and in both of her thighs. Winner, Professional, People category. One day in history - Portraits of children and youths who survived the massacre on the island of Utoeya outside Oslo (NO) on 22nd of July 2011. "In the period after Utoeya I had a really hard time sleeping. I was afraid of the dark and suffered from dreadful nightmares. My mom and I decided that getting a dog might help me, so I got Athene. Now she sleeps on my stomach every night." Iselin Rose Borch (15) from Grong was hiding behind a rock by the pump house on the island. She was rescued by tourists in a boat. Youth Photographer of the Year - Traditions. New Year's eve traditions in Romania.

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view Winners of the 2013 Sony World Photography Awards as presented by: The Atlantic


A little while back Den Efremov, an amateur photographer from Russia, provided us with his set entitled Abandoned Soviet Military Hardware. The response was very good and Den said he had some other sets about left over Soviet hardware. No planes and helicopters this time, but old communist ships. Decaying and rotting away, waiting for someone to slice them up for scrap metal and still managing to look graceful.

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view Abandoned Soviet Ships as presented by: Totally Cool Pix


They trudge up well-trod cinder paths by the thousands, headlamps glowing in the dark, and then settle in, shivering, to await and cheer the sun's blazing ascent over the horizon. Climbing Mount Fuji, Japan's most iconic landmark, is a group activity: Seldom is it climbed in solitude. The recent recognition of the 3,776-meter (12,388-foot) peak as a UNESCO World Heritage site has many here worried that it will draw still more people, adding to the wear and tear on the environment from the more than 300,000 who already climb the mountain each year. Safety is another concern. At least seven people died and 70 were hurt climbing Fuji in 2012, and traffic jams of climbers in the pre-dawn darkness can add to the risks, says Shomei Yokouchi, governor of Yamanashi, the area to the west. The official climbing season runs July to August, and the trek -- nine hours round trip in good weather -- is especially treacherous other times of the year.

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view Mt. Fuji's Heritage status worries some as presented by: Sacramento Bee



From Gael Monfils of France reacting to a lost point against Radel Stepanek during the final of the Legg Mason Tennis Classic, to San Francisco Giants’ Pablo Sandoval celebrating after hitting a home run off Philadelphia Phillies’ Cole Hamels during the ninth inning. These reactions show the level of frustration and joy that athletes and coaches endure in the high pressure world of sports. Jacoby Ellsbury #2 of the Boston Red Sox and Josh Reddick #16 celebrate the win over the New York Yankees on August 6, 2011 at Fenway Park in Boston, Massachusetts.The Boston Red Sox defeated the New York Yankees 10-4. Ana Ivanovic of Serbia reacts to a lost point against Ayumi Morita of Japan during the Bank of the West Classic at the Taube Family Tennis Stadium on July 26, 2011 in Stanford, California. Spain's Marcel Granollers celebrates after defeating Spain's Fernado Verdasco 6-4, 3-6, 6-3 during the ATP tennis tournament on July 31, 2011 in Gstaad.

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view The Game: Reactions as presented by: Denver Post


A body has been found in the desert close to the spot where a pilot disappeared after crash-landing during the war. The wreckage of the P40 Kittyhawk plane was found perfectly preserved earlier this year, 70 years after the accident, and now it seems that airman Dennis Copping's remains may have been recovered nearby. The bones were located on some rocks four months ago, along with a piece of parachute, about three miles from where the plane landed in the Sahara desert in 1942. A keychain fob with the number 61 on it was found near the remains, along with a metal button dated 1939. But the pilot's relatives claim the Ministry of Defence said that the remains were not those of the lost airman. It has since been established that the bones were never recovered or analysed, leaving open the possibility they may be those of Flight Sergeant Copping. His nephew, William Pryor-Bennett, from Kinsale, County Cork, Ireland, has now urged for DNA tests to be carried out as soon as possible. To that end, two British historians and a forensic anatomist have volunteered to travel to Egypt and recover the bones themselves. Mr Pryor-Bennett, 62, said he is ‘appalled’ at the way the matter has been handled. He said: 'The bones suspected to be those of my uncle are apparently still lying in the desert. They were found in June and should have been tested by now.

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view Bones And A Parachute Found Near Eerily Preserved Plane That Crashed In Sahara Desert 70 Years Ago as presented by: Daily Mail Online


A hot air balloon consists of a bag called the envelope that is capable of containing heated air. Suspended beneath is a gondola or wicker basket (in some long-distance or high-altitude balloons, a capsule), which carries passengers and (usually) a source of heat, in most cases an open flame. The heated air inside the envelope makes it buoyant since it has a lower density than the relatively cold air outside the envelope. Unlike gas balloons, the envelope does not have to be sealed at the bottom since the air near the bottom of the envelope is at the same pressure as the surrounding air. In today's sport balloons the envelope is generally made from nylon fabric and the mouth of the balloon (closest to the burner flame) is made from fire resistant material such as Nomex. We've come a long way since hot-air balloons came in one shape: round. Now when we take to the skies in our ponderously slow-moving, brightly festooned dirigibles, we do it in style. And we even get in a little patriotism, like this Stars and Stripes balloon in New Jersey in 2008.

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Britain began flooding London's streets with 16,000 police officers Tuesday, tripling their presence as the nation feared its worst rioting in a generation would stretch into a fourth night. The violence has turned buildings into burnt out carcasses, triggered massive looting and spread to other U.K. cities. Police said they were working full-tilt, but found themselves under attack -- from rioters roaming the streets, from a scared and worried public, and from politicians whose cost-cutting is squeezing police numbers ahead of next year's Olympic Games. London's Metropolitan Police force vowed an unprecedented operation to stop more rioting, flooding the streets Tuesday with 16,000 officers over the next 24 hours, nearly three times Monday's total. Although the riots started Saturday with a protest over a police shooting, they have morphed into a general lawlessness that police have struggled to halt with ordinary tactics. The riots and looting caused heartache for Londoners whose businesses and homes were torched or looted, and a crisis for police and politicians already staggering from a spluttering economy and a scandal over illegal phone hacking by a tabloid newspaper that has dragged in senior politicians and police. London residents wait to be allowed through a police cordon to help council workers with the clear up after the rioting that took place the previous night outside Clapham Junction railway station in Battersea, London, Tuesday, Aug. 9, 2011. Britons swept up, patched up and feared further violence Tuesday, demanding police do more to protect them after three nights of rioting left trails of looted stores, wrecked cars and burned buildings across London and several other cities. An employee of a looted shop cleans up debris in the aftermath of riots in the Clapham area of London Tuesday, Aug. 9, 2011. London mayor Boris Johnson, front center, walks away after addressing local residents waiting to be allowed through a police cordon to help council workers with the clear up at after the rioting that took place the previous night outside Clapham Junction railway station in Battersea, London, Tuesday, Aug. 9, 2011.

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view British Police Face Public Anger As Riots Rage as presented by: Sacramento Bee


Chichen Itza is an ancient Mayan site located on the Yucatán peninsula of Mexico. These famous pre-Columbian ruins signify the rich history of the ancient Mayan civilization. Chichen Itza was likely built around 600 BCE, making the ruins roughly 2600 years old today. The large ruin complex contains many stone buildings, including temples, pyramids, and platforms, as well as various statues and caves. Chichen Itza is a UNESCO World Heritage Site, and is the second most visited archeological site in Mexico. A visit to the site is a popular day drip from nearby Cancún.

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view Chichen Itza, Yucatán, Mexico as presented by: Beautiful Places To Visit



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