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A body has been found in the desert close to the spot where a pilot disappeared after crash-landing during the war. The wreckage of the P40 Kittyhawk plane was found perfectly preserved earlier this year, 70 years after the accident, and now it seems that airman Dennis Copping's remains may have been recovered nearby. The bones were located on some rocks four months ago, along with a piece of parachute, about three miles from where the plane landed in the Sahara desert in 1942. A keychain fob with the number 61 on it was found near the remains, along with a metal button dated 1939. But the pilot's relatives claim the Ministry of Defence said that the remains were not those of the lost airman. It has since been established that the bones were never recovered or analysed, leaving open the possibility they may be those of Flight Sergeant Copping. His nephew, William Pryor-Bennett, from Kinsale, County Cork, Ireland, has now urged for DNA tests to be carried out as soon as possible. To that end, two British historians and a forensic anatomist have volunteered to travel to Egypt and recover the bones themselves. Mr Pryor-Bennett, 62, said he is Ďappalledí at the way the matter has been handled. He said: 'The bones suspected to be those of my uncle are apparently still lying in the desert. They were found in June and should have been tested by now.

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view Bones And A Parachute Found Near Eerily Preserved Plane That Crashed In Sahara Desert 70 Years Ago as presented by: Daily Mail Online


Fallís season colors the world with every imaginable autumn color from Godís masterstroke of palette and brush. During fall, the beauty of nature is like a dreamworld, a fantasy. We encourage you to get out there and enjoy it while it lasts. You only live once and there is something about being out in nature that can balance a person and put their problems into perspective. We hope you enjoy these fantastic photos of autumn, sprinkled with inspirational quotes and words of wisdom. We love these pics!

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view Fall Fantasy: Every imaginable color from Godís masterstroke of palette and brush as presented by: Love These Pics


A lioness yawns under the African sun, with no idea she has just been caught on BeetleCam. A remote-controlled, camouflaged camera allows Will Burrard-Lucas to capture intimate snaps of some of the continent's most fearsome animals, without the risk of being savaged. The 29-year-old wildlife photographer stands about 50m away and uses a model aeroplane remote control to deploy the homemade roving camera into the paths of lions, elephants and buffalo in Zambia.

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view Beetlecam: Remote-controlled Cameras Get Up Close To Lions And Leopards as presented by: Telegraph Media Group



From the titans of high technology to teenagers armed with iPads, millions of people around the world mourned digital-gadget genius Steve Jobs as a man whose wizardry transformed their lives in big ways and small. Google, Sony, Samsung, Microsoft -- corporate giants that have all been bruised in dustups with Jobs' baby, the technology prodigy Apple -- put their rivalries aside Thursday to remember the man behind the iconic products that define his generation: the iPod, the iPhone, the iPad. Fans for whom the Apple brand became a near-religion grasped for comparisons to history's great innovators, as well as its celebrities, to honor the man they credit with putting thousands of songs and the Internet in their pockets. In this Jan. 15, 2008, file photo, Apple CEO Steve Jobs holds up the new MacBook Air after giving the keynote address at the Apple MacWorld Conference in San Francisco. A message is written on the window of the Apple Store in Santa Monica, Calif., Wednesday, Oct. 5, 2011.

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view Millions Mourn Genius Steve Jobs as presented by: Sacramento Bee


The local Chinese community in Thailand belief that abstinence from meat and various stimulants, during the ninth lunar month of the Chinese calendar, will help them obtain good health and peace of mind. They celebrate the vegetarian festival by piercing their own meat and setting of fire crackers. Devotees of the Bang Neow Chinese Shrine walk through exploding firecrackers as they take part in a procession in celebration of the vegetarian festival in Phuket October 2, 2011. The festival celebrates the local Chinese community's belief that abstinence from meat and various stimulants,during the ninth lunar month of the Chinese calendar, will help them obtain good health and peace of mind. A devotee goes into a trance as he takes part in a procession in celebration of the vegetarian festival in Phuket October 2, 2011. A devotee runs on burning charcoals as he performs the fire walking ceremony, during celebrations for the vegetarian festival.

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view Vegetarian Festival In Thailand as presented by: Totally Cool Pix


After having fun with nesting house finches on my front door, a neighbor who enjoyed that saga Email'ed me about a hummingbird nest at a nearby golf course. I have some old pictures of colorado hummingbirds, but had never seen a nest. It's amazing how well camouflaged it is - would have never seen it if it hadn't been pointed out to me - thanks Brian! Be sure to scroll down as the pictures get better ... and check out the Hi-Def videos at the bottom.

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view Baby Hummingbird Nest as presented by: Alek Komarnitsky


A tornado as much as a mile wide with winds up to 200 mph roared through the Oklahoma City suburbs Monday, flattening entire neighborhoods, setting buildings on fire and landing a direct blow on an elementary school. Rescuers lift an injured survivor from the rubble a structure in the aftermath of the huge tornado that struck Moore, Okla., on Monday. A U.S. flag lies across an overturned car in the aftermath of a tornado in Moore, Oklahoma.

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view Powerful Tornado Slams Oklahoma as presented by: Los Angeles Times


Atlantis and four astronauts returned from the International Space Station in triumph Thursday, bringing an end to NASA's 30-year shuttle journey with one last, rousing touchdown that drew cheers and tears. Thousands gathered near the landing strip and packed Kennedy Space Center, and countless others watched from afar, as NASA's longest-running spaceflight program came to a close. With the space shuttles retiring to museums, it will be another three to five years at best before Americans are launched again from U.S. soil, as private companies gear up to seize the Earth-to-orbit-and-back baton from NASA. This image provided by NASA shows the space shuttle Atlantis photographed from the International Space Station as the orbiting complex and the shuttle performed final separation of a space shuttle in the early hours of Tuesday July 19, 2011. Space shuttle Atlantis is towed to the Orbitor Processing facility for decommissioning at the Kennedy Space Center at Cape Canaveral, Fla., Thursday, July 21, 2011. The landing of Atlantis marks the end of NASA's 30-year space shuttle program. Commander Chris Ferguson walks under space shuttle Atlantis after landing at the Kennedy Space Center at Cape Canaveral, Fla. Thursday, July 21, 2011.

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view Space Shuttle Comes to Final Stop After 30 Years as presented by: Sacramento Bee



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