Gallery Gate

Apple co-founder and visionary Steve Jobs died yesterday at the age of 56. Jobs was a man with extraordinary vision, drive, and success; and the technology he helped create has touched and enriched the lives of billions. He focused on creating things of simplicity and beauty matched by an underlying power and utility. When composing this entry, I was surprised to find myself so moved. Coming across the photo of a young Steve introducing the Apple II computer, I remembered learning to program on it. From Basic to Assembly Language, it was on Apple machines that I first developed the key skills I use in my work to this very day. All those years ago, as a high-school kid, my life was enriched by Jobs' efforts, and it continues to be today. Gathered here are images of Steve Jobs, along with a few remembrances from around the world. The first photo is especially striking, because you see in it not only Steve as a proud CEO walking the stage at the top of his game, but as a human being, a simple silhouette of the man who inspired so many. This 1977 file photo shows Apple co-founder Steve Jobs as he introduces the new Apple II in Cupertino, California. Apple CEO Steve Jobs holds up the new MacBook Air after giving the keynote address at the Apple MacWorld Conference in San Francisco, Tuesday, Jan. 15, 2008. A Malaysian takes a photograph with an iPhone on a signboard to pay tribute to Steve Jobs, the Apple founder and former CEO, at an Apple computer outlet in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, on October 6, 2011.

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view Steve Jobs, 1955-2011 as presented by: The Atlantic


Internationally-renowned photojournalist Gerd Ludwig has spent years documenting the aftermath of the Chernobyl nuclear disaster. In 1986, errors at the plant in Ukraine led to an explosion that ultimately caused over a quarter of a million people to permanently evacuate their homes to escape the radiation and radioactive fallout. Over the course of several trips to the site and the region for National Geographic Magazine in 1993, 2005, and 2011, Ludwig has amassed a documentary record of a people and a place irreparably altered by a tragic accident. His 2011 trip was partially funded by a Kickstarter campaign. Now Ludwig has released an iPad app with over 150 photographs, video, and interactive panoramas. Gathered here is a small selection of the work Ludwig has produced over the years of the still-unfolding tragedy. On April 26, 1986, operators in this control room of reactor No. 4 at the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant committed a fatal series of errors during a safety test, triggering a reactor meltdown that resulted in the world's largest nuclear accident to date. Today, the control room sits abandoned and deadly radioactive. Kharytina Descha, 92, is one of the several hundred elderly people who have returned to their village homes inside the Exclusion Zone. Although surrounded by devastation and isolation, she prefers to die on her own soil. Each year on April 26 in a midnight vigil at the Monument to the Firemen, shift workers in Chernobyl honor those killed by the explosion. Two plant workers died immediately in the blast, and another 28 workers and firemen soon succumbed to radiation poisoning. Thousands more have since died of cancer and the social upheaval caused by mass relocation.

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view Gerd Ludwig's Long Shadow of Chernobyl project as presented by: Boston Big Picture


Once again, on the occasion of Sanfermines, photo agencies provide images of bulls fighting in the arenas. At 990px ??is probably already the third set of photographs from Spain and perhaps the last. Catalan parliament voted for the prohibition of fighting bulls in the entire region, starting from 2012. Korrida is part of the Catalan tradition of many centuries. The first messages on it already comes from the fourteenth century. The dispute over the korride lasts for decades. Its opponents argue that it amounts to torture an animal that bleeds to the delight of the crowd. While proponents point out that the corrida is a unique art of combining into a coherent whole choreography, costume and music. Matador is like a sculptor at the same time that Brandt did not clay, but an animal.

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view Korrida ends of Catalonia as presented by: 990 PX



Officially a collectivity of France, the island of Bora Bora lies in the Leeward group of the Society Islands of French Polynesia. With its amazing reef, fantastic white sand beaches, and laid-back local population it is easy to see why Bora Bora is considered by many to be paradise on Earth. The island itself features an extinct volcano in the center and is surrounded by a lagoon and a barrier reef. Bora Bora is a tourist hot-spot and many resorts and over-the-water bungalows have been built on the island. The population of locals is just under 9,000 with Tahitian, French, and some English spoken. Visitors can enjoy world-class diving and snorkeling, as well as sunset catamaran cruises, fishing trips, and jet ski rentals. For discounted flights and hotels, visit our Travel Page and check out the coupon codes for many major booking sites.

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view Bora Bora, French Polynesia as presented by: Beautiful Places To Visit


The space shuttle Endeavour is on its last mission today, a 12-mile creep through Los Angeles city streets on a 160-wheeled carrier. It is passing through neighborhoods and strip malls, headed toward its final destination, the California Science Center in South Los Angeles. At times, the shuttle has barely cleared trees, houses and and street signs along a course heavily prepared for the trip. The move will cost an estimated $10 million, according to the Exposition Park museum. Gathered here are a few images of Endeavour's last journey. Endeavour is slowly moved across Interstate 405 by a Toyota Tundra, on October 12, 2012, in Los Angeles. The space shuttle Endeavour is transported to The Forum arena for a stopover and celebration on its way to the California Science Center from Los Angeles International Airport (LAX) on October 12, 2012 in Inglewood, California. The space shuttle Endeavour is on 12-mile journey from Los Angeles International Airport to the California Science Center to go on permanent public display. Amir Morris, 3, waves an American flag as Endeavour passes by, in Los Angeles, on October 13, 2012.

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view A Space Shuttle on the Streets of Los Angeles as presented by: The Atlantic


Even though the 2013 Red River flood is not as severe as the National Weather Service initially forecasted, it still made for dramatic images. The river rose from 15 feet just a few weeks ago when the "before" photos in this series were taken, to 33 feet this week.

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view Fargo And Moorhead, Before And During Flooding as presented by: Minnesota Public Radio


Late on the night of April 20th, 50 miles from the shore of Louisiana, a fire broke out aboard the Transocean Deepwater Horizon oil rig under lease by BP, with 126 individuals on board. After a massive explosion, all but 11 of the crew managed to escape as the rig was consumed by fire, later collapsing and sinking into the Gulf. Safeguards set in place to automatically cap the oil well in case of catastrophe did not work as expected, and now an estimated 5,000 barrels (over 200,000 gallons) of crude oil is pouring into the Gulf of Mexico every day - and could possibly continue to do so for months as complicated efforts are made to stop the leak. Collected here are several recent photos of the developing situation along Louisiana's Gulf Shore - one with the potential to eclipse the 1989 Exxon Valdez oil spill in scope and damage. Firefighting boats spray seawater onto the burning Deepwater Horizon oil rig on April 21, 2010. The oil platform burned for 36 hours after a massive explosion, then later sank into the Gulf of Mexico. A Louisiana Heron rests in the fragile wetlands near the town of Venice, in the path of the oil spill that is creeping towards the coast of Louisiana. Workers move containment booms to a smaller vessel on the Mississippi River at Port Eads, Louisiana on Thursday, April 29, 2010. A huge effort is underway to help mitigate the effects of an oil spill caused by the explosion of the Deepwater Horizon rig.

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view Oil Spill Approaches Louisiana coast as presented by: Boston Big Picture


Flooding and landslides from the season's first tropical storm have killed at least 144 people and left thousands homeless in Central America, officials said Monday. Dozens of people are still missing and emergency crews are struggling to reach isolated communities cut off by washed-out roads and collapsed bridges caused by Tropical Storm Agatha. In all some 110,000 people were evacuated in Guatemala. Thousands more have fled their homes in neighboring Honduras, where the death toll rose to 15 even as meteorologists predicted three more days of rain. In El Salvador, at least 179 landslides have been reported and 11,000 people were evacuated. The death toll was nine, President Mauricio Funes said. Agatha made landfall near the Guatemala-Mexico border Saturday as a tropical storm with winds up to 45 mph (75 kph). It dissipated the following day over the mountains of western Guatemala. Rescue efforts in Guatemala have been complicated by a volcanic eruption Thursday near the capital that blanketed parts of the area with ash. Guatemala City's La Aurora airport remained closed Sunday because of heavy ash that fell from last week's eruptions of Pacaya volcano. But volcanic activity had tapered off Sunday, allowing helicopters and small planes to deliver aid to communities still unreachable on washed out roads. People try to cross the overflowed Huiza River as others look from a damaged bridge in La Libertad, 40 km south of San Salvador. An orange alert was issued by the Salvadorean goverment on Saturday due to heavy rains, as tropical storm Agatha already killed one person, authorities said. A couple remove mud with a bucket the from their home, destroyed by tropical strom Agatha on May 30, 2010, in the village of Los Almendros, in the municipality of Palin, Escuintla 39 km south of Guatemala City. People look at a car destroyed by a mudslide caused by tropical storm Agatha on May 30, 2010, in the municipality of Palin, Escuintla, 36 km south of Guatemala City.

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view Volcanos and storms ravage Central and South America as presented by: Sacramento Bee



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