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Images from Kerry Skarbakka‘s long-term project “The Struggle to Right Oneself” are currently on view at the Kopeikin Gallery in Los Angeles. “Ten Years of Falling,” as the show is appropriately named, includes 28 anxiety-ridden images of the artist in precarious situations, such as falling off rocks, ladders, buildings and trees. Skarbakka has a background in rock climbing, martial arts and acting, which makes him the perfect stuntman. The photographs are shot on location, occasionally with the use of ropes or a harness. Whatever Skarbakka lands on is intentionally obscured either in camera or, when necessary, with Photoshop. Skarbakka referred to himself as a performance-based photographer in a 2009 interview on NBC’s Today show. “I use my body to describe these tensions and anxieties I’m trying to create, and I use photography to disseminate my ideas.”"Ten Years of Falling” at the Kopeikin Gallery is currently on view through September 7, 2013.

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view Falling Forever as presented by: Photo District News


If you are scared of creepy crawlies you might want to look away now. These are the remarkable close-up photographs of flies composed by stitching together up to 687 separate images taken through a microscope. Tomas Rak photographs a tiny area of the fly under a microscope before moving it a mere five hundredth of a millimetre and taking another snap. It can take a staggering 687 movements and 'micro-photographs' to capture every part of the fly in such stunning detail. Astonishing colours gleam on the head of a dung beetle, Anoplotrupes Stercorosus. Its entire body is only 10mm long. The whiskery head of a Vespula Vulgaris, the common wasp. The photographs are the result of an ingenious photography technique using a microscope. The shimmering and exquisite head of a wasp, measuring just 2mm. Even the hairs on its antennae are clear.

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view Photographer Captures Flies In Exquisite Detail as presented by: Daily Mail Online


For many, photographs from the World War II have only been seen in grainy black and white. But now, new colour images have emerged that show the full horror of the destruction inflicted by Nazi bombings across London. The powerful images were released to mark the 70th anniversary of the launch of Winston Churchill's 'V for Victory' campaign on July 19, 1941. In this extraordinary picture, the double-decker bus is still visible amid crumbling tarmac and bent girders left in an enormous crater caused by a bomb which landed in the middle of a Balham high street, south London. A symbol of resilience: The Houses of Parliament with part of them covered in scaffolding are seen across the River Thames on a sunny day in 1941. The random nature of the bombing is clearly demonstrated here as a church, right, remains untouched while a vast swathe of buildings close by were reduced to rubble.

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view Amazing Color Pictures Of London Under Siege From Nazi Bombers During World War II as presented by: Daily Mail Online



The two suspects in the Boston Marathon bombing killed an MIT police officer and hurled explosives at police in a car chase and gun battle overnight that left one of them dead and his brother on the run, authorities said Friday as thousands of officers swarmed the streets in a manhunt that all but paralyzed the Boston area. The suspects were identified by law enforcement officials and family members as Dzhokhar and Tamerlan Tsarnaev, ethnic Chechen brothers from Dagestan, which neighbors Chechnya in southern Russia. They lived near Boston and had been in the U.S. for about a decade, an uncle said. Tamerlan Tsarnaev, a 26-year-old who had been known to the FBI as Suspect No. 1 and was seen in surveillance footage in a black baseball cap, was killed overnight, officials said. His brother, a 19-year-old college student who was dubbed Suspect No. 2 and was seen wearing a white, backward baseball cap in the images from Monday’s deadly bombing at the marathon finish line—escaped. Their uncle in Maryland, Ruslan Tsarni, pleaded on live television: “Dzhokhar, if you are alive, turn yourself in and ask for forgiveness.”

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view Photos: Manhunt for Boston Marathon Bombing Suspect as presented by: Denver Post


Daredevils have been hurling themselves down a hill in Gloucestershire as part of the annual cheese-rolling competition despite fears over the safety of the event. The contest, which involves chasing a round of Double Gloucester down Cooper's Hill, has been held here since at least the early 1800s. This year's event was won by an American estate agent wearing a 'stars and stripes' jumpsuit.

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view Gloucestershire Cheese Rolling 2013 as presented by: GigaPica


The Danube River reached its highest level in 500 years. The Elbe, Rhine, and other rivers and tributaries are cresting high as well as swathes of central Europe lie inundated by floodwaters that have killed 12 and displaced tens of thousands. Germany, Austria, Switzerland, and the Czech Republic have been severely affected, as Hungary prepares for the swell of water. Gathered here are images of the flooding and people affected in the last several days. A rescue worker ropes down a police helicopter on June 3, 2013 in Passau, Germany. A worker inspects the heavily damaged road between Lofer and Waidring in the Austrian province of Tyrol on June 3, 2013. Firemen pump water from a submerged field near Melnik, Czech Republic on June 4, 2013.

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view Flooding in Europe as presented by: Boston Big Picture


Kindergarten kids' drawings that depict children killing U.S. soldiers hang on the wall at Kaeson Kindergarten in central Pyongyang on March 9, 2013. For North Koreans, the systematic indoctrination of anti-Americanism starts as early as kindergarten. North Korean women descend the steps of Mansu Hill in Pyongyang after bowing beneath the feet of two statues to pay respects to their late leaders Kim Il Sung and Kim Jong Il. North Korean hospital staff use traditional Koryo-style medicine to treat a man suffering from chronic stomach pain at Pyongyang Medical College on February 21, 2013. Both modern and traditional styles of healing have long been uniquely intertwined across North Korea, with doctors from both schools working in tandem under one roof.

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view North Korea In Widescreen: Panoramas of life and landscapes in North Korea as presented by: National Geographic


Nearly a week has passed since Japan suffered its worst crisis since World War II. More than 4,000 have been confirmed killed and more than 8,000 remain missing after the 9.0-magnitude earthquake struck the northeast coast of Japan six days ago. The hundreds of thousands now displaced by the quake, the ensuing tsunami -- and now, fears of radioactivity -- are scattered across the country, finding shelter and aid where they can, as they begin to rebuild their lives as survivors. Search-and-rescue teams from several countries have now joined Japanese forces, scouring the vast fields of rubble that were neighborhoods and towns just last week. Collected here are recent images of the ongoing recovery efforts and of Japanese citizens coping with this historic disaster. A Japanese home drifts in the Pacific Ocean in this photograph taken on March 13, 2011 and released on March 14. Ships and aircrafts from the U.S. Navy's Ronald Reagan Carrier Strike Group are searching for survivors in the coastal waters near Sendai, Japan, in the wake of 9.0-magnitude earthquake and tsunami that officials say claimed at least 10,000 lives. A woman walks away from a message wall after writing a message to the victims of last week's earthquake and tsunami in Japan in central Seoul, South Korea. Medical staff use a Geiger counter to screen a photographer for possible radiation exposure at a public welfare center in Niigata, northern Japan March 16, 2011. Radiation has been released into the atmosphere at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant run by Tokyo Electric Power Co. on the country's northeast coast, which was badly damaged after a massive earthquake and tsunami on March 11.

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view Japan Earthquake: The Struggle to Recover as presented by: The Atlantic



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