Gallery Gate

In his 10 years in the U.S. Army, Luis Lopez served 10 years in Iraq and Afghanistan, earning medals and rising to the rank of staff sergeant. Mr. Lopez is also an illegal immigrant. The 28-year-old native of Mexico was discharged in December from the Army after applying for U.S. citizenship. His case reflects the federal government’s complex relationship with illegal immigrants in the armed forces. Mr. Lopez’s story took a few twists and turns, including a recommendation from his commanding officer that he granted citizenship. On Wednesday, in an office in Anchorage, Alaska, he became a citizen. Luis Lopez holds a photo of himself in his former Staff Sgt. Army uniform while living in his girlfriend’s apartment in Eagle River Alaska. Lopez was discharged after ten years of honorable service because he applied for citizenship and is awaiting the outcome of his pending immigration case. Mr. Lopez takes the U.S. citizenship oath on Wednesday in Anchorage, Alaska. Mr. Lopez reviews paperwork at a citizenship ceremony on Wednesday.

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view Soldier Finds Minefield on Road to Citizenship as presented by: Wall Street Journal


Yesterday in Huntington Beach, California, the third annual multi-faith Blessing of the Waves event was held to honor the ocean and protest coastal pollution. Several thousand reportedly attended the event, in part to recognize a spiritual aspect of man's relationship to water, the coastline, and the surf. Whether it's massive rolling ocean waves, or standing waves in rivers, or wind-driven lakewater, people around the world find a way to get out and ride on belly boards, kiteboards, longboards, wakeboards and more. As summer rolls to a close, find here a collection of recent photographs of these waveriders around the world over the past several months. Former three-time Association of Surfing Professionals (ASP) World Champion Andy Irons from Kauai, Hawaii rides the tube of a wave Friday Sept. 3, 2010. Irons captured his first ASP World Tour victory in three years defeating CJ Hobgood in the final. Dane Reynolds, of Venture Beach, California, flies over a wave during his round 3 heat in the The Hurley Pro surfing competition in San Clemente. An Israeli man kitesurfs in the Mediterranean sea at the southern Israeli city of Ashkelon.

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view Waveriders as presented by: Boston Big Picture


The New York Times- The use of air power has changed markedly during the long Afghan conflict, reflecting the political costs and sensitivities of civilian casualties caused by errant or indiscriminate strikes and the increasing use of aerial drones, which can watch over potential targets for extended periods with no risk to pilots or more expensive aircraft.

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view In Focus: The War from the Sky as presented by: Denver Post



Passenger Benjamin Levy took this photo of passengers from Asiana Airlines flight 214 being treated by first responders on the tarmac just moments after the plane crashed at the San Francisco International Airport in San Francisco. Asiana Airlines flight attendants and rescued passengers rest on the runway after flight 214 crash landed at San Francisco International Airport. A photo taken by passenger Eugene Anthony Rah. Passenger Benjamin Levy took this photo of passengers from Asiana Airlines flight 214 being treated by first responders on the tarmac just moments after the plane crashed at the San Francisco International Airport in San Francisco.

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view San Francisco Plane Crash: Photos Taken By Passengers Moments After Disaster as presented by: Telegraph Media Group


In Poland (as well as in other Slavic countries as the Czech Republic, Slovakia and Ukraine) Children's Day is celebrated on 1 June 1952. Its initiator is an organization called the International Union for Protection of Childhood, whose aim was to ensure the safety of children from around the world Many of the presented images has a background that can not be described in a few words. Therefore, if you do not know the conditions under which coal is mined in the Jaintia Hills, or what is the Lord's Resistance Army, then spare a moment to find this information.

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view Children's Day 2011 as presented by: 990 PX


A career criminal shot Kristina Ripatti just below her armpit. The bullet slid behind her bulletproof vest and severed her spinal cord, leaving her paralyzed from the chest down. But Ripatti, an LAPD gang officer, retained the use of her arms, and that has made all the difference. With those well-muscled arms, she has continued to surf, camp and fish, not to mention drive, keep house and look after her two young children. She has completed the Boston and Los Angeles marathons on a hand cycle and is preparing for a cross-country bicycle race. Sports and fitness were a big part of her life before her spinal injury. After it, they became her keys to survival. Ripatti works with locomotor training rehabilitation specialists at NextStep Fitness, an all-handicap-accessible gym. The goal of this particular regimen is to get the nerves in Ripatti's spinal cord to remember the movements the trainers help her achieve. Ripatti works out at Gold's Gym with personal trainer Lou Sidella, who has been working with her for more than two years. "You just don't give up; giving up is not an option," Ripatti said. Ripatti, center, graduates from the Los Angeles Police Department Academy in September 1997. At left is her mother, Margaret McConnell, and at right is her grandmother, Margaret Rowe.

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view Paralyzed Police Officer A Portrait In Perseverance as presented by: Los Angeles Times


ellow evokes the shine of the sun and is found throughout nature and the man-made world as a color that commands attention. This highly visible hue is found on everything from bumblebees to school buses, traffic signs to highlighters. Misbehaving soccer players are shown yellow as a warning, and Tour de France racers know the man in yellow is the rider to beat. The upper floors of Shanghai’s 88-story Jin Mao Tower provide a dizzying view of hotel rooms and offices below. Standing nearly 1,380 feet, the tower is one of the tallest buildings in China. The yellow hues of a small home in Lanai City, Hawaii, are matched by its owner's vintage Plymouth. Many residents of this village live in such pastel-pain ted cottages, first built for pineapple plantation workers. Eyelash vipers are indigenous to Central and South America and come in a variety of colors, including shocking yellow.

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view Life in Color: Yellow as presented by: National Geographic


Demonstrators across Turkey took to the streets again this morning, continuing a week of unprecedented protest against what they see as Prime Minister Tayyip Erdogan's authoritarian rule, police brutality, and the destruction of Istanbul's Taksim Park for the sake of a development project. More than 4,300 people have been wounded so far in a dozen cities, and at least two have died. Members of the Turkish government offered apologies for excessive use of police force, but Erdogan remained dismissive and defiant, insisting he will continue with the planned development of Taksim Park. Collected here are scenes from Turkey over the past few days, as tens of thousands remain in the streets, and the government shows no sign of making concessions. A couple wearing gas masks walk in a street between Taksim and Besiktas in Istanbul, Turkey, on June 4, 2013 during an anti-government demonstration. What started as an outcry against a local development project has snowballed into widespread anger against what critics say is the government's increasingly conservative and authoritarian agenda. A protester waves the Turkish flag from a roof top at Taksim square on June 3, 2013 in Istanbul. Riot police walk past a burning barricade during clashes with anti-government protesters in Ankara, early on June 5, 2013.

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view A Week of Furious Protest in Turkey as presented by: The Atlantic



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