Gallery Gate

Starting late last week, with several small protests denouncing a hike in public transport fares, demonstrations flared up yesterday, encompassing larger public anger at poor public services, police violence and government corruption. More than 200,000 took to the streets of Brazil's biggest cities yesterday, voicing frustration with the billions of dollars set aside for upcoming sports events like the World Cup and the 2014 Olympics, despite crushing levels of poverty in some places, and underfunded public education, health, security and transportation. Though the majority of the protests were peaceful, a few violent demonstrations were broken up by police in Rio de Janeiro. 8

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view Protests Spread Across Brazil as presented by: The Atlantic


Sumo is the national sport of Japan and is almost 2000 years old. It's not only the oldest of Japan’s various martial arts, it also evolved into the most distinct and ritualistic. We've selected some pictures of Sumo Wrestling worldwide. A sumo wrestler walks under cherry blossoms in full bloom on his way to a bout for the 'Honozumo', an exhibition sumo tournament at the Yasukuni Shrine precincts, in Tokyo, Japan. "Yokozuna", or sumo grand champion, Hakuho from Mongolia (facing) throws compatriot Kakuryu to the dirt during their playoff bout at the Spring Grand Sumo tournament in Osaka.

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view The Big Picture goes Sumo Wrestling! as presented by: GigaPica


Michael Karkoc, 94, told American authorities in 1949 that he had performed no military service during World War II, concealing his work as an officer and founding member of the SS-led Ukrainian Self Defense Legion and later as an officer in the SS Galician Division, the AP reports. In this May 22, 1990 photo, Michael Karkoc, photographed in Lauderdale, Minn. prior to a visit to Minnesota from Soviet President Mikhail Gorbachev in early June of 1990. Karkoc, a top commander whose Nazi SS-led unit, is blamed for burning villages filled with women and children lied to American immigration officials to get into the United States and has been living in Minnesota since shortly after World War II, according to evidence uncovered by The Associated Press. In this picture taken May 10, 2013, a monument pays tribute to civilians who were burned alive during WWII in Pidhaitsi close to Ukraine's western city of Lutsk. The monument reads: 'To our parents, wives, children, who were murdered by the German occupants on December 3, 1943 in Pidhaitsi. 21 people, including 9 children.' Evidence uncovered by AP indicates that Ukrainian Self Defense Legion commander Michael Karkoc's unit was in the area at the time of the massacre. The photo taken June 3, 2013 in Chicago shows the header of Michael Karkoc's petition for naturalization obtained from the U.S. National Archives in Illinois. The petition was granted. Karkoc a top commander whose Nazi SS-led unit is blamed for burning villages filled with women and children lied to American immigration officials to get into the United States and has been living in Minnesota since shortly after World War II.

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view Former Nazi SS commander Michael Karkoc as presented by: Minnesota Public Radio



While investigators work to discover who placed the bombs near the finish line of the Boston Marathon, people in Boston and around the world are paying tribute to the victims. Mourners have come together for candlelight vigils, running groups have staged memorial runs, and individuals have spent time in prayer or reflection. Collected here are images of some of these memorials, from Boston to Belgrade to Beijing. Local residents attend a candlelight vigil in the Dorchester neighborhood of Boston, Massachusetts, on April 16, 2013 where eight-year-old Boston Marathon explosion victim Martin Richard lived. A Little League baseball player, Martin lived in a blue Victorian house in working-class Dorchester - a Boston neighborhood dotted with "Kids at Play" traffic signs and budding trees - with his parents Bill and Denise, sister Jane, 7, and brother Henry, 10. Martin's mother and sister were seriously injured. Members of the New York Yankees and the umpires bow their heads during a moment of silence for those killed in a bomb blast at the Boston Marathon on April 15, before their MLB Interleague game with the Arizona Diamondbacks at Yankee Stadium in New York. A building at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology is lit up in red, white and blue as a tribute to those who were killed or injured in the explosions at the Boston Marathon in Cambridge, Massachusetts.

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view Memorials and Tributes for Boston as presented by: The Atlantic


With his self-confidence at a high and luck finally on his side, Australia's Cadel Evans could achieve something special this year in the Tour de France. The two-time runner-up was third in the overall standings enterng the 10th stage Tuesday, the best placing among the favorites, after surviving a crash-marred week that saw several contenders bow out. The BMC team leader finished behind Alberto Contador in 2007 and Carlos Sastre in 2008. Last year, Evans wore the yellow jersey but broke his left elbow and settled for a 26th-place finish on the Champs Elysees. Regarded as an underachiever until he become world champion in 2009, Evans is stronger this year. A helicopter of the French TV hovers over the pack with Thor Hushovd of Norway, wearing the overall leader's yellow jersey, center, during the fourth stage of the Tour de France cycling race over 172.5 kilometers (107.2 miles) starting in Lorient and finishing in Mur de Bretagne, Brittany, western France, Tuesday July 5, 2011. Frederik Willems of Belgium, left, and David Zabriskie of the US, right, are being treated by Tour de France doctors after crashing during the 9th stage of the Tour de France cycling race over 208 kilometers (129 miles) starting in Issoire and finishing in Saint Flour, central France, Sunday July 10, 2011. The peloton is reflected in Allagnon river near the village of Lempdes sur Allagnon as they ride during the 9th stage of the Tour de France cycling race over 208 kilometers (129 miles) starting in Issoire and finishing in Saint Flour, central France, Sunday July 10, 2011.

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view Evans Looking Good at Tour de Carnage as presented by: Sacramento Bee


Photographers of all levels submitted their best image series that captured the essence of “community.” Winners will see their work on the 1000ft long photographic installation displayed in Brooklyn Bridge Park in New York City and, new this year, in a special curated version of THE FENCE displayed along the Rose Kennedy Greenway in Boston. THE FENCE is an annual summer-long outdoor photo exhibition thanks to United Photo Industries, Photo District News (PDN), Brooklyn Bridge Park and Flash Forward Festival. The unveiling of THE FENCE 2013 happens tonight, Tuesday, June 18, at 6pm. The event is free and open to the public.

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view Don’t Fence Me In as presented by: Photo District News


They call him the “Godfather.” For 14 years, John Watkins held supreme authority over the homeless encampments deep in the Hollywood hills. So it was with some trepidation that volunteers armed with clipboards picked their way up a rugged trail to his mountain hideaway one morning, hoping he would answer questions about his health and housing situation. Their goal: to identify and find homes for the 20 people at greatest risk of early death if left on the streets of Hollywood. Organizers of the grass-roots effort had no money to help those they interviewed. But they hoped that by putting names and faces to some of the most vulnerable residents, the community would rally to help. A year later, the early results are promising. Thirty-seven chronically homeless people are in apartments; 34 others are expected to be housed within weeks, and more than $800,000 has been raised to sustain the effort. Watkins, right, at an appointment with Orem. It took several months for volunteers to persuade Watkins, the "Godfather" of the Hollywood Hills, to move into an apartment.

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view Helping the Hollywood Homeless as presented by: Los Angeles Times


A little while back Den Efremov, an amateur photographer from Russia, provided us with his set entitled Abandoned Soviet Military Hardware. The response was very good and Den said he had some other sets about left over Soviet hardware. No planes and helicopters this time, but old communist ships. Decaying and rotting away, waiting for someone to slice them up for scrap metal and still managing to look graceful.

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view Abandoned Soviet Ships as presented by: Totally Cool Pix



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