Death Valley National Park Photos as presented by: National Geographic

Rocks sculptured by erosion, richly tinted mudstone hills and canyons, luminous sand dunes, and lush oases populate Death Valley National Park. Native Americans, most recently the Shoshone, found ways to adapt to the more recent and forbidding desert conditions that exist here now. Thickly clumped stems of arrowweed (Pluchea sericea) form the "corn shocks" of the Devil's Cornfield in Death Valley National Park. A popular nearby area is the Devil's Golf Course, a rocky, salt-encrusted area where "only the devil could play golf." A road sign spells it out for drivers on a lonely stretch in Death Valley National Park: You're well below sea level here. The park is known for extremes: It is North America's driest and hottest spot and it has the lowest elevation on the continent.

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view Death Valley National Park Photos as presented by: National Geographic



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