Searching for IED in Afghanistan as presented by: Sacramento Bee

An improvised explosive device (IED), also known as a roadside bomb due to contemporary use, is a homemade bomb constructed and deployed in ways other than in conventional military action. IEDs have been used extensively against coalition forces and by the end of 2007 they had become responsible for approximately 40% of coalition deaths in Iraq, according to Wikipedia. They are also the weapon of choice for insurgent groups in the 2001-present Afghanistan War. It has been reported that IEDs are the number one cause of death among NATO troops in Afghanistan. The U.S. has the most training in discovering and disarming these explosives. Getty Images photographer Justin Sullivan recently spent time with U.S. Army soldiers with Task Force Thor Route Clearance Patrol from 23rd Engineering Company, Airborne near Khakriz, Afghanistan. The U.S. Army route clearance unit uses specialized equipment to seek out IED on roads throughout Afghanistan to prevent military patrols and civilians from being hit by the homemade roadside bombs. U.S. Army soldiers with Task Force Thor Route Clearance Patrol from 23rd Engineering Company, Airborne detonate an Improvised Explosive Device (IED) that they discovered during a day-long route clearance mission July 7, 2010 near Khakriz, Afghanistan. U.S. Army First Lieutenant Tom Keenan from Brasher Falls, New York with Task Force Thor Route Clearance Patrol, 23rd Engineering Company, Airborne smokes a cigar before departing on a route clearance misison July 8, 2010 in Khakrez, Afghanistan. A U.S. Army convoy with Task Force Thor Route Clearance Patrol, 23rd Engineering Company, Airborne passes a car as they move through a valley during a route clearance misison July 8, 2010 near Khakrez.

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