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New Zealand’s north island is home to Mount Taranaki, or Mount Egmont, a 2,518 meter (8,261 ft) tall active volcano. Taranaki is quite young for a volcano, having become active only 135,000 years ago. Its most recent activity was a mere 160 years ago. Mount Taranaki is the center of the Egmont National Park, the circular tree-line boundary of which can be seen in two of the photos below. Visitors to the mountain can enjoy the Manganui ski resort for skiing and snowboarding. Those more adventurous types can trek to the summit during the summer months. The closest major town is New Plymouth, just north of the mountain, where all types of hotels and other accommodation can be found.

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view Mount Taranaki, New Zealand as presented by: Beautiful Places To Visit


Here's a photographer who will go to great heights in his search for the ultimate picture. Jimmy Chin, probably the world's greatest adventure photographer, has travelled the world with highly-skilled mountain climbers, scaling huge peaks and even skiing down the face of Mount Everest. To work with Steph Davis as she became the first woman to free climb El Capitan's Salathe Wall in Yosemite, was an honour and a privilege. "I am always concerned with finding the right spot and the right shot, so sometimes I forget to appreciate the skill of my fellow adventurers, but I am aware of how my life has been changed by my ability with a camera." Dean Potter, one of the greatest high line walkers in the world, walks on a one-inch thick piece of webbing over a 500 foot deep chasm at Canyonlands National Park in Indian Creek, Utah, in January 2007. Of all his adventures though, his ascents of Everest stand out as his most physically demanding and rewarding. "You do wonder - when you are at 28,000 feet, the height that aeroplanes cruise at, when you are struggling to draw breath and every limb aches - why do I do this?"

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view Mountain Climbers Scale Some Of The Highest Peaks In The World as presented by: Telegraph Media Group


Eruptions at Indonesia’s deadly volcano appeared to be intensifying Thursday as towering clouds of ash shot from the crater with a thunder-like roar, dusting towns up to 150 miles (250 kilometers) away and forcing motorists to switch on their headlights during the day. The death toll climbed to 44 – with six more lives recorded in the last 24 hours – and the government repeated orders to airlines to stay clear of the unpredictable mountain. Mount Merapi, which means “Fire Mountain,” is one of the world’s most active volcanoes. But even those who have dedicated a lifetime to studying it have been baffled by its erratic behavior since its first Oct. 26 eruption, which has been followed by more than a dozen other powerful blasts and thousands of volcanic tremors. They’d earlier hoped that would result in a long, slow release of energy. “But we have no idea what to expect now,” said Surono, a state volcanologist, adding that he has never seen the needle on Merapi’s seismograph working with such intensity. The fear is that a new lava dome forming in the mouth of the crater will collapse, triggering a deadly surge of 600 degree Fahrenheit (1,000 Celsius) ash and gas – known to experts as pyroclastic flows – at speeds of 60 miles per hour (100 kilometers per hour). Villagers with their faces covered with volcanic ash, flee their homes on motorcycles following the eruption of Mount Merapi in Klaten, Central Java, Indonesia, Wednesday, Nov. 3, 2010. Indonesia's deadly volcano erupted Wednesday with its biggest blast yet, shooting searing ash miles into the sky and forcing the hasty evacuations of panicked villagers and emergency shelters near the base. Mount Merapi spews volcanic material as seen from Klaten, Indonesia, Thursday, Nov. 4, 2010. Searing gas and molten lava poured from Indonesia's deadly volcano in an explosion three times as powerful as last week's devastating blast, chasing people from villages and emergency shelters along its slope. A woman wearing a mask examines her house covered with ash after the first eruption on October 26, taken at Kaliadem village on the slope of Merapi mountain in Sleman on October 31, 2010. Indonesia's most active volcano which had claimed at least 36 lives last week spewed more searing clouds of gas and ash on October 31, triggering fresh panic among locals.

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view Captured: Mount Merapi Erupts Again as presented by: Denver Post


Standing inside a live volcano hoping to catch a chicken or some vegetables for some might be the height of stupidity. For these people on the Indonesian island of Java it serves as a way to provide food for their families despite the incredible danger. The Hindu festival of Yadnya Kasada is the main festival of the Tenggerese people in Probolinggo, East Java. The festival lasts about a month but on the fourteenth day, the Tenggerese make the journey to the volcano of Mount Bromo to make offerings of rice, fruits, vegetables, flowers and livestock to the mountain gods by throwing them into the volcano's caldera. The origin of the festival lies in the 15th century when a princess named Roro Anteng started the principality of Tengger with her husband Joko Seger, and the childless couple asked the mountain Gods for help in bearing children.

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view Villagers Catch Offerings Thrown Into The Crater Of Volcano as presented by: Telegraph Media Group


On May 18th, 1980, thirty years ago today, at 8:32 a.m., the ground shook beneath Mount St. Helens in Washington state as a magnitude 5.1 earthquake struck, setting off one of the largest landslides in recorded history - the entire north slope of the volcano slid away. As the land moved, it exposed the superheated core of the volcano setting off gigantic explosions and eruptions of steam, ash and rock debris. The blast was heard hundreds of miles away, the pressure wave flattened entire forests, the heat melted glaciers and set off destructive mudflows, and 57 people lost their lives. The erupting ash column shot up 80,000 feet into the atmosphere for over 10 hours, depositing ash across Eastern Washington and 10 other states. Collected here are photos of the volcano and its fateful 1980 eruption. The melted Dashboard of pickup truck located on ridge top about 14 km north of Mount St. Helens demonstrates the powerful heat generated by the volcanic blast. Photo taken on June 18, 1980. An aerial view of blowdown and Fawn Lake, inside the blast zone on October 28, 1980 (note Mount St. Helens in the background). Note also the USGS scientists in a small boat in the middle of the lake taking water samples. The distinctive bloom of a Fireweed, a hearty pioneer plant, is seen with Spirit Lake in the background on September 4, 1984.

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view Mount St. Helens, 30 Years Ago as presented by: Boston Big Picture


Towering over nearby Portland, Oregon, is the Majestic Mount Hood. It stands 3,429 meters (11,249 feet) tall and is home to 12 glaciers. Mount Hood has 6 ski resorts: Timberline, Mount Hood Meadows, Ski Bowl, Cooper Spur, Snow Bunny and Summit. Timberline is the only year-round ski-lift in all of North America. Mount Hood is a dormant volcano, but it is consider the volcano most likely to erupt in Oregon with a 7% chance of eruption in the next 30 years. It is popular with climbers in addition to skiers, and about 10,000 people reach its summit yearly. Hikers can enjoy trekking on the Timberline Trail which circumnavigates the mountain, and the Pacific Crest Trail also passes by via the Timberline Trail. Most of the ski resorts have beautiful lodges to stay in, and any kind of accommodation can be found in the city of Portland, 124 km (77 miles) away. There are also many small towns in the area that offer some accommodation, including Government Camp, the closest town to the ski resorts.

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view Mount Hood, Oregon, United States as presented by: Beautiful Places To Visit


On June 7th, 2008, the nearby Rocky Mountain Airport put on an awesome airshow. I had borrowed a 100-400 telephoto lens from a friend to test with my Canon 40D DSLR. While we had a great vantage point on a second floor open patio, we were North of the runway looking into the early afternoon Sun (plus there was quite a bit of heat shimmer) so the lighting conditions were far from ideal. However, these pictures are semi-decent and provide a feel for this cool event where you could hear lotsa Jet Noise - the Sound of Freedom! So salute the men & women in uniform and their service to our country. Yaw'ing to the right - note rudder position. We had arrived as the B-25 did its last flyover, which then landed with the Colorado foothills in the background. Note only the left burner is lit plus right nozzle hasn't opened up. My brother (a former F-15 pilot) says sometimes they both don't light at the same time, although this persisted for several seconds which he said is a bit unusual.

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view Rocky Mountain Airport Airshow as presented by: Alek Komarnitsky



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